The Effect of a Near-Infrared Light Vein Viewing Device on the Venipuncture Success Rate in Pediatric Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183075
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of a Near-Infrared Light Vein Viewing Device on the Venipuncture Success Rate in Pediatric Patients
Author(s):
Hess, Holly
Author Details:
Holly Hess, RN, BSN, CRNI, Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL, email: holly.hess@bmcjax.com
Abstract:
Purpose: Venipuncture is a necessary and common intervention in hospitalized patients, and can be especially challenging in children, often requiring multiple attempts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a vein-viewing device on the success rate of venipunctures performed by staff nurses on a pediatric surgical unit. The research question was "Does use of a specific biomedical device designed to facilitate vascular access improve first-attempt vascular insertion success in hospitalized pediatric surgical patients?" Method: This was a prospective study of pediatric inpatients requiring vascular access. Nursing staff began collecting data by self-report following a training period on the use of the device. The number of attempts, age of the patient, and time required to establish successful vascular access were recorded (n=91). This data was compared to baseline data (n=150) previously collected on the same unit prior to the implementation of the device. First attempt success rate and the number of attempts per patient were the outcome variables. In addition, length of procedure time was compared between the two groups. Findings: The first attempt success rate for the control group was 49.3%, and for the experimental group 80.2% (p <.001). The mean number of attempts per patient decreased from 1.97 in the control group to 1.29 in the experimental group (p <.001). Comparison of procedure times revealed that 52.8% of procedures were completed in less than 15 minutes in the control group, whereas 86.7% were completed in less than 15 minutes for the experimental group (p < .001). Discussion: Use of a biomedical vein viewing device significantly improved first-attempt venipuncture success rate, decreased the number of attempts per patient, and decreased procedure time for the study population.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of a Near-Infrared Light Vein Viewing Device on the Venipuncture Success Rate in Pediatric Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHess, Hollyen_US
dc.author.detailsHolly Hess, RN, BSN, CRNI, Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL, email: holly.hess@bmcjax.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183075-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Venipuncture is a necessary and common intervention in hospitalized patients, and can be especially challenging in children, often requiring multiple attempts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a vein-viewing device on the success rate of venipunctures performed by staff nurses on a pediatric surgical unit. The research question was &quot;Does use of a specific biomedical device designed to facilitate vascular access improve first-attempt vascular insertion success in hospitalized pediatric surgical patients?&quot; Method: This was a prospective study of pediatric inpatients requiring vascular access. Nursing staff began collecting data by self-report following a training period on the use of the device. The number of attempts, age of the patient, and time required to establish successful vascular access were recorded (n=91). This data was compared to baseline data (n=150) previously collected on the same unit prior to the implementation of the device. First attempt success rate and the number of attempts per patient were the outcome variables. In addition, length of procedure time was compared between the two groups. Findings: The first attempt success rate for the control group was 49.3%, and for the experimental group 80.2% (p &lt;.001). The mean number of attempts per patient decreased from 1.97 in the control group to 1.29 in the experimental group (p &lt;.001). Comparison of procedure times revealed that 52.8% of procedures were completed in less than 15 minutes in the control group, whereas 86.7% were completed in less than 15 minutes for the experimental group (p &lt; .001). Discussion: Use of a biomedical vein viewing device significantly improved first-attempt venipuncture success rate, decreased the number of attempts per patient, and decreased procedure time for the study population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:13:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:13:29Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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