2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183088
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Shared Governance: A Three Year Study
Author(s):
Mayes, Diane; Janzen, Sandra; Quigley, Pat
Author Details:
Diane Mayes, MSN, RN, CCRN, James A. Haley VAMC, Tampa, FL, email: diane.mayes@med.va.gov; Sandra Janzen; Pat Quigley
Abstract:
< Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a redesigned nursing organizational structure within a designated Magnet Hospital on nurses' opinion of shared governance, satisfaction and autonomy. The Magnet Hospitals are widely known for a culture of professional nurses' autonomy and shared governance (Kramer, 2002). Magnet Hospital designation, awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet Commission, recognition is the highest level of acknowledgment that the ANCC accords to organized nursing services. It denotes excellence in nursing services and development of nursing staff in a professional practice environment. Thus, our specific study objective is to compare pre-implementation levels of satisfaction and autonomy with levels one and two years post implementation. To address the study objective, three research questions are delineated:
1. What is the relationship between staff nurses' opinions about shared governance as an organizational model and their overall workplace satisfaction?
2. What are the changes in satisfaction and perceived autonomy over time?
3. How does the effect of shared governance on perceived autonomy differ compared to other domains of nursing satisfaction (pay, organizational policies, task requirements, and collaboration)?
Method: Design. A one group pre-test/post-test study design will be used to address the research questions. The intervention of shared governance "councilor" model is both an intervention and a planned organizational change. Data consisted of both retrospective and primary data. The baseline (pre-test) data came from a previous study (2002) that was R&D and IRB approved. Data were collected at various timeframes in 2004, 2005 and 2006.
Findings: The Nursing Satisfaction Survey (NSS) was administered Pre- Intervention (2002) and 3 years post intervention (2004-2006). The Nurses Opinion Questionnaire (NOQ) was also administered although data is only available for the post intervention period, 2004-2006. A total of 191 nurses participated in the NSS in the 2002 administration. A total of 177,197 and 140 nurses completed the NSS and NOQ in years 2004, 2005 and 2006 respectively. The findings will be presented. Briefly, as the awareness and knowledge of Share Governance increases (becomes more positive) there is a corresponding significant decrease in the scores for all the components of the reported nurse satisfaction scores, which denotes higher satisfaction. This relationship was also seen between increasing positive influence of the organization's staff and positive work environment and a corresponding significant increased reported nurse satisfaction. A significant difference among the different years was found for satisfaction with Autonomy, Task Requirements, Organizational Policies and Professional status. All these satisfaction scores showed a slight increase across time, which represents a decrease in satisfaction. Although some overall differences were found, in comparing the 2002 pre intervention means with the 2004-2006 post intervention mean score results for Direct Pt Care Nurses were all statistically significant, but greater influence, by order of greatest significance: Organizational Policy, Autonomy, and Pay whereas Non-Direct Care Respondents had greatest influence in: Organizational Policies, Professional Status, and Autonomy.
Discussion: The findings of this study support prior research about the effectiveness of shared governance in improving autonomy of nurses. The link between shared governance variables and clinical patient outcomes need further research. Thus, our plans are to continue research, study the relationship between staff and clinical outcomes, and continue investigating the impact of shared governance on nurse satisfaction and autonomy.
This study has R&D and IRB Approval.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Shared Governance: A Three Year Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMayes, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorJanzen, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Paten_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Mayes, MSN, RN, CCRN, James A. Haley VAMC, Tampa, FL, email: diane.mayes@med.va.gov; Sandra Janzen; Pat Quigleyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183088-
dc.description.abstract< Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a redesigned nursing organizational structure within a designated Magnet Hospital on nurses' opinion of shared governance, satisfaction and autonomy. The Magnet Hospitals are widely known for a culture of professional nurses' autonomy and shared governance (Kramer, 2002). Magnet Hospital designation, awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet Commission, recognition is the highest level of acknowledgment that the ANCC accords to organized nursing services. It denotes excellence in nursing services and development of nursing staff in a professional practice environment. Thus, our specific study objective is to compare pre-implementation levels of satisfaction and autonomy with levels one and two years post implementation. To address the study objective, three research questions are delineated:<br/>1. What is the relationship between staff nurses' opinions about shared governance as an organizational model and their overall workplace satisfaction?<br/>2. What are the changes in satisfaction and perceived autonomy over time?<br/>3. How does the effect of shared governance on perceived autonomy differ compared to other domains of nursing satisfaction (pay, organizational policies, task requirements, and collaboration)?<br/>Method: Design. A one group pre-test/post-test study design will be used to address the research questions. The intervention of shared governance &quot;councilor&quot; model is both an intervention and a planned organizational change. Data consisted of both retrospective and primary data. The baseline (pre-test) data came from a previous study (2002) that was R&amp;D and IRB approved. Data were collected at various timeframes in 2004, 2005 and 2006.<br/>Findings: The Nursing Satisfaction Survey (NSS) was administered Pre- Intervention (2002) and 3 years post intervention (2004-2006). The Nurses Opinion Questionnaire (NOQ) was also administered although data is only available for the post intervention period, 2004-2006. A total of 191 nurses participated in the NSS in the 2002 administration. A total of 177,197 and 140 nurses completed the NSS and NOQ in years 2004, 2005 and 2006 respectively. The findings will be presented. Briefly, as the awareness and knowledge of Share Governance increases (becomes more positive) there is a corresponding significant decrease in the scores for all the components of the reported nurse satisfaction scores, which denotes higher satisfaction. This relationship was also seen between increasing positive influence of the organization's staff and positive work environment and a corresponding significant increased reported nurse satisfaction. A significant difference among the different years was found for satisfaction with Autonomy, Task Requirements, Organizational Policies and Professional status. All these satisfaction scores showed a slight increase across time, which represents a decrease in satisfaction. Although some overall differences were found, in comparing the 2002 pre intervention means with the 2004-2006 post intervention mean score results for Direct Pt Care Nurses were all statistically significant, but greater influence, by order of greatest significance: Organizational Policy, Autonomy, and Pay whereas Non-Direct Care Respondents had greatest influence in: Organizational Policies, Professional Status, and Autonomy.<br/>Discussion: The findings of this study support prior research about the effectiveness of shared governance in improving autonomy of nurses. The link between shared governance variables and clinical patient outcomes need further research. Thus, our plans are to continue research, study the relationship between staff and clinical outcomes, and continue investigating the impact of shared governance on nurse satisfaction and autonomy. <br/>This study has R&amp;D and IRB Approval.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:14:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:14:02Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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