2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183092
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Distress in Nurses: Repercussions to Managing Pain and Symptoms at the End-of-Life
Author(s):
Ohler, Lisa
Author Details:
Lisa Ohler, RN, MSN, email: lisa.ohler@flaglerhospital.org
Abstract:
Purpose:
The purpose of this literature review is to identify the moral distress encountered by nurses caring for patients at the end-of-life. By identifying strategies that will prevent and alleviate moral distress, repercussions will be lessened and patient and provider outcomes will show improvement. The following research question guided this reviewÆs development: What are the best methods for preventing and alleviating moral distress in nurses managing pain and symptoms at the end-of-life?

Method:
For this literature review the following databases were searched: MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. Articles selected from this search were peer reviewed, in English, and from the years of 1997 to presents. Additional studies were found by hand searching bibliographies of published papers and The Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. Dissertations were excluded from selected articles. Research that did not include nurses that had experience with death and dying were also excluded. The key search terms used were: nurs*; moral distress; ethical dilemma; end-of-life; palliative care; ethics: pain and symptom control; terminal sedation.

Findings:
The degree that the nurse felt adequately educated, supported, and valued as a team member would influence moral distress. If left unresolved it would affect the nurseÆs ability to provide effective pain and symptom management at the end-of-life and would have repercussions on positive patient outcomes. The research question evolved to try and discover solutions to alleviate and prevent moral distress.

Discussion
Educators must build curriculums that prepare nurses for palliative care and recognizing the repercussions of moral distress. If we do not find ways to manage conflicts and to reach consensus regarding the most ethical and genuinely loving way to provide care that is compassionate and patient centered, then each of us is at risk of suffering at the end of our life. Death comes to all. Suffering need not.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Distress in Nurses: Repercussions to Managing Pain and Symptoms at the End-of-Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOhler, Lisaen_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Ohler, RN, MSN, email: lisa.ohler@flaglerhospital.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183092-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:<br/>The purpose of this literature review is to identify the moral distress encountered by nurses caring for patients at the end-of-life. By identifying strategies that will prevent and alleviate moral distress, repercussions will be lessened and patient and provider outcomes will show improvement. The following research question guided this review&AElig;s development: What are the best methods for preventing and alleviating moral distress in nurses managing pain and symptoms at the end-of-life?<br/><br/>Method:<br/>For this literature review the following databases were searched: MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. Articles selected from this search were peer reviewed, in English, and from the years of 1997 to presents. Additional studies were found by hand searching bibliographies of published papers and The Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. Dissertations were excluded from selected articles. Research that did not include nurses that had experience with death and dying were also excluded. The key search terms used were: nurs*; moral distress; ethical dilemma; end-of-life; palliative care; ethics: pain and symptom control; terminal sedation.<br/><br/>Findings:<br/>The degree that the nurse felt adequately educated, supported, and valued as a team member would influence moral distress. If left unresolved it would affect the nurse&AElig;s ability to provide effective pain and symptom management at the end-of-life and would have repercussions on positive patient outcomes. The research question evolved to try and discover solutions to alleviate and prevent moral distress.<br/><br/>Discussion<br/>Educators must build curriculums that prepare nurses for palliative care and recognizing the repercussions of moral distress. If we do not find ways to manage conflicts and to reach consensus regarding the most ethical and genuinely loving way to provide care that is compassionate and patient centered, then each of us is at risk of suffering at the end of our life. Death comes to all. Suffering need not.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:14:12Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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