Effect of Two Methods of Using Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Complications in Surgical Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183096
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Two Methods of Using Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Complications in Surgical Patients
Author(s):
Pellegata, Anna; Bourke, Carrie; Berhane, Almaz; Cross, Laverne; Filbert, Caroline; Mangum, Gracie; Rearden, Sandra; Overby, Vicky
Author Details:
Anna Pellegata, RN, Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, NC, email: anna.pellegatta@rexhealth.com; Carrie Bourke, RN, BSN; Almaz Berhane, RN, BSN; Laverne Cross, RN; Caroline Filbert, RN; Gracie Mangum, RN; Sandra Rearden, BSN; Vicky Overby, RN,BSN,MSN,CMSRN
Abstract:
Purpose: This study compared two different methods for educating postoperative patients about use of incentive spirometry: usual teaching; enhanced teaching and reinforcement. Methods: Using a convenience sample of postoperative abdominal surgical patients, subjects were taught with one of the two different teaching methods on their first postoperative day. The first 33 subjects were assigned to receive usual IS teaching (verbal instruction at time of IS initiation and random RN reinforcement of importance of IS). Following staff education, the next 33 subjects were assigned to receive enhanced teaching and reinforcement (videotape of IS teaching, a written IS information reminder at the bedside, and an IS performance log for patient completion). Dependent variables were measures of respiratory status (% predicted maximal IS volumes achieved; hours of temperature > 100.5 degrees F; noninvasive oxygen saturation on room air; requirement for supplemental oxygen) which were collected on each of 3 days postoperatively in subjects in both groups. Data was analyzed with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using the values obtained on postoperative day 1 as the covariate, with a level of significance of p < 0.05. Findings: A total of 66 subjects were studied (N=33 in usual teaching group; N=33 in enhanced teaching and reinforcement group). Percent of predicted incentive spirometry volumes in both groups increased during the 3 postoperative days of the study. Over half the subjects in both groups required oxygen therapy on postoperative day 1 and by day 3 almost all subjects were no longer requiring oxygen therapy. With Day 1 values used as a covariate, no statistical differences were found between the two methods for educating patients about the use of incentive spirometry. Discussion: This study found that the use of enhanced teaching and reinforcement, compared to usual teaching, did not improve measures of respiratory status in postoperative abdominal surgical patients.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Two Methods of Using Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Complications in Surgical Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPellegata, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBourke, Carrieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerhane, Almazen_US
dc.contributor.authorCross, Laverneen_US
dc.contributor.authorFilbert, Carolineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMangum, Gracieen_US
dc.contributor.authorRearden, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorOverby, Vickyen_US
dc.author.detailsAnna Pellegata, RN, Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, NC, email: anna.pellegatta@rexhealth.com; Carrie Bourke, RN, BSN; Almaz Berhane, RN, BSN; Laverne Cross, RN; Caroline Filbert, RN; Gracie Mangum, RN; Sandra Rearden, BSN; Vicky Overby, RN,BSN,MSN,CMSRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183096-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study compared two different methods for educating postoperative patients about use of incentive spirometry: usual teaching; enhanced teaching and reinforcement. Methods: Using a convenience sample of postoperative abdominal surgical patients, subjects were taught with one of the two different teaching methods on their first postoperative day. The first 33 subjects were assigned to receive usual IS teaching (verbal instruction at time of IS initiation and random RN reinforcement of importance of IS). Following staff education, the next 33 subjects were assigned to receive enhanced teaching and reinforcement (videotape of IS teaching, a written IS information reminder at the bedside, and an IS performance log for patient completion). Dependent variables were measures of respiratory status (% predicted maximal IS volumes achieved; hours of temperature &gt; 100.5 degrees F; noninvasive oxygen saturation on room air; requirement for supplemental oxygen) which were collected on each of 3 days postoperatively in subjects in both groups. Data was analyzed with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using the values obtained on postoperative day 1 as the covariate, with a level of significance of p &lt; 0.05. Findings: A total of 66 subjects were studied (N=33 in usual teaching group; N=33 in enhanced teaching and reinforcement group). Percent of predicted incentive spirometry volumes in both groups increased during the 3 postoperative days of the study. Over half the subjects in both groups required oxygen therapy on postoperative day 1 and by day 3 almost all subjects were no longer requiring oxygen therapy. With Day 1 values used as a covariate, no statistical differences were found between the two methods for educating patients about the use of incentive spirometry. Discussion: This study found that the use of enhanced teaching and reinforcement, compared to usual teaching, did not improve measures of respiratory status in postoperative abdominal surgical patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:14:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:14:22Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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