2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183097
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Speech intelligibility and cognition: Are inpatients impaired by noise?
Author(s):
Pope, Diana; Gallun, Frederick
Author Details:
Diana Pope, PhD, MS, RN, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR, email: diana.pope@va.gov; Frederick Gallun, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: Hospitals are noisy - and they are getting noisier - rising from a daytime average of 57 decibels in 1960 to 72 decibels today. Hard, sound-reflecting surfaces aggravate the noise problem by generating long reverberation times that result in echoes, blending and overlapping of sounds. To make themselves understood in this environment, people need to raise their voices, thereby compounding the noise problem even further. Demonstrating impairment currently experienced, and determining decibel levels that permit adequate speech interpretation and recall in typical hospital noise, will guide us to those environmental and behavioral interventions most likely to promote effective communication. The study is designed to:
1) Examine the extent to which noise typical of nursing units reduces speech intelligibility in acutely ill hospitalized patients; 2) Examine the extent to which noise typical of nursing units impairs recall in acutely ill hospitalized patients; and 3) Quantify severity of reduced performance associated with age, familiarity with health care setting, hearing and health status.
Methods: One hundred and twenty medical/surgical inpatients - 60 with and 60 without hearing impairments - will be recruited to participate in the study. Following ascertainment of eligibility and obtaining informed consent, patients will be tested in a sound booth housed at the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research. Each patient serves as his or her own control, permitting considerable baseline variability between patients without adversely affecting required sample size. Performance in speech intelligibility and recall tasks will be measured using a constant level of speech in controlled environments of no noise (baseline), white noise, hospital noise and hospital noise with speech, all delivered via headphones in pseudo-random order. Selected decibel levels mimic those currently experienced on nursing units and those that prior studies have shown are more conducive to effective communication.
Findings: Study in progress.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpeech intelligibility and cognition: Are inpatients impaired by noise?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPope, Dianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallun, Fredericken_US
dc.author.detailsDiana Pope, PhD, MS, RN, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR, email: diana.pope@va.gov; Frederick Gallun, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183097-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Hospitals are noisy - and they are getting noisier - rising from a daytime average of 57 decibels in 1960 to 72 decibels today. Hard, sound-reflecting surfaces aggravate the noise problem by generating long reverberation times that result in echoes, blending and overlapping of sounds. To make themselves understood in this environment, people need to raise their voices, thereby compounding the noise problem even further. Demonstrating impairment currently experienced, and determining decibel levels that permit adequate speech interpretation and recall in typical hospital noise, will guide us to those environmental and behavioral interventions most likely to promote effective communication. The study is designed to:<br/>1) Examine the extent to which noise typical of nursing units reduces speech intelligibility in acutely ill hospitalized patients; 2) Examine the extent to which noise typical of nursing units impairs recall in acutely ill hospitalized patients; and 3) Quantify severity of reduced performance associated with age, familiarity with health care setting, hearing and health status.<br/>Methods: One hundred and twenty medical/surgical inpatients - 60 with and 60 without hearing impairments - will be recruited to participate in the study. Following ascertainment of eligibility and obtaining informed consent, patients will be tested in a sound booth housed at the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research. Each patient serves as his or her own control, permitting considerable baseline variability between patients without adversely affecting required sample size. Performance in speech intelligibility and recall tasks will be measured using a constant level of speech in controlled environments of no noise (baseline), white noise, hospital noise and hospital noise with speech, all delivered via headphones in pseudo-random order. Selected decibel levels mimic those currently experienced on nursing units and those that prior studies have shown are more conducive to effective communication. <br/>Findings: Study in progress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:14:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:14:25Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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