2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183098
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring Ability of Practicing Nurses
Author(s):
Pross, Elizabeth; Hilton, Nancy; Boykin, Anne; Gabuat, Jesse
Author Details:
Elizabeth Pross, PhD, RN, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing; St Lucie Medical Center; Florida Atlantic Univ, Port St. Lucie, FL, email: epross@fau.edu; Nancy Hilton, MSN, RN; Anne Boykin, PhD, RN; Jesse Gabuat, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Theory: All persons are caring and we continually grow in our ability to express caring. It is important to come to know nursing colleagues as caring in order that we may nurture and support our colleagues in their professional caring practice (Boykin A & Schoenhofer S, 2001 & Mayeroff, 1972 ). Purpose: This current research aimed to study caring phenomena among practicing nurses in an organization prior to the planned intervention in which an organization adopted caring values and nursing departments adopted Nursing as Caring theory. This study builds on earlier research of earlier research of Nursing as Caring in a telemetry unit and emergency department (Boykin A, Schoenhofer S, et. al. & Boykin A, Bulfin S, et. al., 2004)

Design and Methods: In a nonexperimental correlational design, Nkongho's Caring Ability Inventories (CAI) were completed by 131 practicing nurses at one for-profit health care organization in a southeastern city located in the United States. All the nurses at this organization had been invited to participate. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlations were used to analyze data.

Mayeroff's Caring Ingredients Measured by the Caring Ability Inventory (Nkongho, 1990): Knowing -14 items;
Patience -13 items; Courage - 10 items.

Results: With Cronback's alphas of .77, .73 and .65 for the subscales and .82 for CAI total, results showed highest scores for the subscale Knowing, followed by Patience and then Courage. Pearson correlations revealed statistical significance with the three subscales. As Knowing increased so did Patience. Interestingly, as Knowing or Patience increased, Courage decreased.

Conclusion: This study confirmed practicing nurses were able to reveal certain caring abilities prior to an intervention to introduce caring values and theory. This study couldnÆt conclude low Courage levels are indicative of nurses only at this organization. Extant literature revealed while courage in nursing practice is essential and significant, it's mostly invisible in practice and in the literature(Clancy 2003; Day 2007; Spence & Smythe 2007; & Walston 2003). As this is the first study of a larger project, it will be important to see if any of the caring scores increase after the planned intervention.

Practice Relevance. There are many aspects to the expression of caring in nursing practice. This study demonstrates a call for nursing colleagues to support nurses in their unique living of courage in practice.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring Ability of Practicing Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPross, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHilton, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoykin, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorGabuat, Jesseen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Pross, PhD, RN, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing; St Lucie Medical Center; Florida Atlantic Univ, Port St. Lucie, FL, email: epross@fau.edu; Nancy Hilton, MSN, RN; Anne Boykin, PhD, RN; Jesse Gabuat, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183098-
dc.description.abstractTheory: All persons are caring and we continually grow in our ability to express caring. It is important to come to know nursing colleagues as caring in order that we may nurture and support our colleagues in their professional caring practice (Boykin A &amp; Schoenhofer S, 2001 &amp; Mayeroff, 1972 ). Purpose: This current research aimed to study caring phenomena among practicing nurses in an organization prior to the planned intervention in which an organization adopted caring values and nursing departments adopted Nursing as Caring theory. This study builds on earlier research of earlier research of Nursing as Caring in a telemetry unit and emergency department (Boykin A, Schoenhofer S, et. al. &amp; Boykin A, Bulfin S, et. al., 2004)<br/><br/>Design and Methods: In a nonexperimental correlational design, Nkongho's Caring Ability Inventories (CAI) were completed by 131 practicing nurses at one for-profit health care organization in a southeastern city located in the United States. All the nurses at this organization had been invited to participate. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlations were used to analyze data. <br/><br/>Mayeroff's Caring Ingredients Measured by the Caring Ability Inventory (Nkongho, 1990): Knowing -14 items;<br/>Patience -13 items; Courage - 10 items.<br/><br/>Results: With Cronback's alphas of .77, .73 and .65 for the subscales and .82 for CAI total, results showed highest scores for the subscale Knowing, followed by Patience and then Courage. Pearson correlations revealed statistical significance with the three subscales. As Knowing increased so did Patience. Interestingly, as Knowing or Patience increased, Courage decreased. <br/><br/>Conclusion: This study confirmed practicing nurses were able to reveal certain caring abilities prior to an intervention to introduce caring values and theory. This study couldn&AElig;t conclude low Courage levels are indicative of nurses only at this organization. Extant literature revealed while courage in nursing practice is essential and significant, it's mostly invisible in practice and in the literature(Clancy 2003; Day 2007; Spence &amp; Smythe 2007; &amp; Walston 2003). As this is the first study of a larger project, it will be important to see if any of the caring scores increase after the planned intervention. <br/><br/>Practice Relevance. There are many aspects to the expression of caring in nursing practice. This study demonstrates a call for nursing colleagues to support nurses in their unique living of courage in practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:14:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:14:27Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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