2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183113
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression and the Shifting Effect
Author(s):
Tyerman, Jane
Author Details:
Jane Tyerman, BA, RN, BScN, MSc, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, email: jjt@queensu.ca
Abstract:
Purpose:
The imposed lifestyle associated with shift-work is thought to adversely affect many aspects of nurses' mental health. Studies suggest that nurses generally have higher psychological morbidity rates than the general population. The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses claims depression is more common in nurses than in the general population. Minimal research has focused on depression as a direct consequence of shift-work for registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of shift-work on depressive symptoms in registered nurses.

Method:
A descriptive correlational design was used to describe the relationship among depressive symptoms and shift-work using the CES-D (Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale). The study was a secondary analysis of data collected from 159 registered nurses enrolled in the study 'Work and Health: Optimizing nurses' physical health in hospital work environments'.

Findings:
No statistical significance between CES-D score and shift-work was identified. Within measure analysis revealed a positive association between shift work and lack of concentration, decreased motivation to complete tasks and difficulty sleeping. Fifty-two percent of this population identified problems keeping focus on the tasks they were performing, forty percent described an alteration in motivation and sixty-nine percent reported sleep disturbances.

Discussion:
Understanding the relationship between shift-work and specific depressive symptoms is key to enhancing patient safety and the quality of care. Depressive symptoms such as lack of concentration, decreased motivation and sleep disturbance influence mental well-being, energy level, cognition, work efficiency and ultimately, patient safety. Studies addressing the effects of shift-work on mental health need to explore options to enhance the quality of life and quality of care provided by the workers. When the work environment focuses on the health of its workers, patient safety will most likely be enhanced.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression and the Shifting Effecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorTyerman, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsJane Tyerman, BA, RN, BScN, MSc, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, email: jjt@queensu.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183113-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:<br/>The imposed lifestyle associated with shift-work is thought to adversely affect many aspects of nurses' mental health. Studies suggest that nurses generally have higher psychological morbidity rates than the general population. The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses claims depression is more common in nurses than in the general population. Minimal research has focused on depression as a direct consequence of shift-work for registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of shift-work on depressive symptoms in registered nurses. <br/><br/>Method:<br/>A descriptive correlational design was used to describe the relationship among depressive symptoms and shift-work using the CES-D (Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale). The study was a secondary analysis of data collected from 159 registered nurses enrolled in the study 'Work and Health: Optimizing nurses' physical health in hospital work environments'.<br/><br/>Findings:<br/>No statistical significance between CES-D score and shift-work was identified. Within measure analysis revealed a positive association between shift work and lack of concentration, decreased motivation to complete tasks and difficulty sleeping. Fifty-two percent of this population identified problems keeping focus on the tasks they were performing, forty percent described an alteration in motivation and sixty-nine percent reported sleep disturbances. <br/><br/>Discussion:<br/>Understanding the relationship between shift-work and specific depressive symptoms is key to enhancing patient safety and the quality of care. Depressive symptoms such as lack of concentration, decreased motivation and sleep disturbance influence mental well-being, energy level, cognition, work efficiency and ultimately, patient safety. Studies addressing the effects of shift-work on mental health need to explore options to enhance the quality of life and quality of care provided by the workers. When the work environment focuses on the health of its workers, patient safety will most likely be enhanced.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:15:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:15:06Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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