The Critical Nature of Nursing Involvement in Design, Planning, Implementation and Evaluation of Point of Care Technologies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183114
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Critical Nature of Nursing Involvement in Design, Planning, Implementation and Evaluation of Point of Care Technologies
Author(s):
Weckman, Heather; Janzen, Sandra K.
Author Details:
Heather Weckman, MS, CNL-BC, BSN, RN-BC, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, FL, email: heather.weckman@va.gov; Sandra K. Janzen, MS, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose:
The purpose of this poster is to illustrate the pivotal role of nurses and the vital need for nursing involvement in all phases of project development and implementation of new technology into the patient care setting. Involvement of nurses as users and stakeholders in the use of information technology and equipment is frequently vocalized but less often realized. Technology is frequently resisted or goes unused because of ineffective incorporation of nurses throughout the design, planning, implementation and evaluation phases. The value of nurses' involvement is demonstrated with real-life examples of lessons learned with implementation of point of care (POC) technology.

Method:
Approaching system-wide change to integrate technology at the point of care, we used planned change theory and small tests of change for program improvements. This approach is based on program evaluation and quality improvement. Implementation requires following the plan developed in the planning phase; however, frequent adjustments are to be anticipated and changes negotiated within the team. It is also important to inform the senior leaders if the plan is significantly changed due to unforeseen circumstances or if patient safety is jeopardized in any way.
Several PDSA cycles happened concurrently to address different issues. Throughout the implementation process, PDSA cycles work effectively to address small issues that were readily fixed. Also, the human-computer interaction (HCI) framework provided a way to think about the dynamics of nurse and computer interaction.

Findings:
Nurses need to be involved in software design. The results of system design and testing enabled our nurses to have input with programmers design for the software necessary to: 1) document nursing care; 2) document at the point of care; and 3) assure that nursing practice standards, i.e., assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation is supported by the technology. Without this involvement, creation of new software and project implementation in any sector has a low rate of success. We determined there are three main reasons why projects will succeed: 1) user involvement, 2) executive management support, and 3) a clear statement of requirements. Without these three factors the chance of failure increases dramatically http://www.cs.nmt.edu/~cs328/reading/Standish.pdf.
Our program of success will be presented.
Discussion:
Progress has been made in moving technology to the bedside for nurses. Nurses' involvement throughout all processes - design, planning, implementation, and evaluation - is one of the keys to success. Without nurses' involvement the chance of success drops dramatically. We must listen very carefully to the comments and feedback from nurses. They provide the clues to the underlying systemic issues and ideas for possible resolution.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Critical Nature of Nursing Involvement in Design, Planning, Implementation and Evaluation of Point of Care Technologiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWeckman, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorJanzen, Sandra K.en_US
dc.author.detailsHeather Weckman, MS, CNL-BC, BSN, RN-BC, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, FL, email: heather.weckman@va.gov; Sandra K. Janzen, MS, RN, NEA-BC, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183114-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:<br/>The purpose of this poster is to illustrate the pivotal role of nurses and the vital need for nursing involvement in all phases of project development and implementation of new technology into the patient care setting. Involvement of nurses as users and stakeholders in the use of information technology and equipment is frequently vocalized but less often realized. Technology is frequently resisted or goes unused because of ineffective incorporation of nurses throughout the design, planning, implementation and evaluation phases. The value of nurses' involvement is demonstrated with real-life examples of lessons learned with implementation of point of care (POC) technology.<br/><br/>Method:<br/>Approaching system-wide change to integrate technology at the point of care, we used planned change theory and small tests of change for program improvements. This approach is based on program evaluation and quality improvement. Implementation requires following the plan developed in the planning phase; however, frequent adjustments are to be anticipated and changes negotiated within the team. It is also important to inform the senior leaders if the plan is significantly changed due to unforeseen circumstances or if patient safety is jeopardized in any way. <br/>Several PDSA cycles happened concurrently to address different issues. Throughout the implementation process, PDSA cycles work effectively to address small issues that were readily fixed. Also, the human-computer interaction (HCI) framework provided a way to think about the dynamics of nurse and computer interaction.<br/><br/>Findings: <br/>Nurses need to be involved in software design. The results of system design and testing enabled our nurses to have input with programmers design for the software necessary to: 1) document nursing care; 2) document at the point of care; and 3) assure that nursing practice standards, i.e., assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation is supported by the technology. Without this involvement, creation of new software and project implementation in any sector has a low rate of success. We determined there are three main reasons why projects will succeed: 1) user involvement, 2) executive management support, and 3) a clear statement of requirements. Without these three factors the chance of failure increases dramatically http://www.cs.nmt.edu/~cs328/reading/Standish.pdf.<br/>Our program of success will be presented. <br/>Discussion:<br/>Progress has been made in moving technology to the bedside for nurses. Nurses' involvement throughout all processes - design, planning, implementation, and evaluation - is one of the keys to success. Without nurses' involvement the chance of success drops dramatically. We must listen very carefully to the comments and feedback from nurses. They provide the clues to the underlying systemic issues and ideas for possible resolution.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:15:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:15:08Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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