Nursing Impact on the Effectiveness of Routinely Offering Rapid HIV Testing to Hospitalized Patients - A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183115
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Impact on the Effectiveness of Routinely Offering Rapid HIV Testing to Hospitalized Patients - A Pilot Study
Author(s):
Weinberg, Amy; Parry, P.; Parry, M.
Author Details:
Amy Weinberg, MS, NP, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT, email: aweinberg@stamhealth.org; P. Parry, RN, CCRC; M. Parry, MD
Abstract:
Purpose:
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend routinely offering Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) testing in all healthcare settings. This recommendation has not been widely implemented. This observational pilot study aimed to determine factors influencing patients' decision to accept or decline an HIV test and to identify barriers and facilitators to the feasibility of such a program. Study findings relevant to nursing are presented here.

Methods:
The study was Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved and conducted in a Magnet-recognized community hospital from August to October, 2008. Demographic data was collected, interviews were conducted, and rapid HIV antibody testing was offered to consenting adults on medical and surgical care units. Interactions with nursing staff recorded during the study.

Findings:
Initially, nurses appeared to be concerned about offering the test to patients. Requiring charge nurse involvement prior to approaching the patient was identified as a time barrier to recruitment. The support of nursing leadership helped to increase visibility of the study and in turn improved nursing participation. Nursing comfort level improved as the study progressed and patient experiences were positive. In turn, nurses began to refer patients to study personnel.

Discussion:
Successful research ventures on patient care units require nurses to be agents for patient support and referral for testing. This was demonstrated in our study. Performing rapid HIV tests on inpatients avoids follow-up errors that so often occur in the outpatient setting. Whether the test is positive or negative, the process piloted herein helped to develop counseling and support skills by nurses who are familiar with all the resources in their institution, and who could ultimately mobilize a multidisciplinary team to individualize patient care. Given the limitations of this study, future research of nurses as an agent offering routine HIV testing in the inpatient setting would also be beneficial.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Impact on the Effectiveness of Routinely Offering Rapid HIV Testing to Hospitalized Patients - A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWeinberg, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorParry, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorParry, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsAmy Weinberg, MS, NP, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT, email: aweinberg@stamhealth.org; P. Parry, RN, CCRC; M. Parry, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183115-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:<br/>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend routinely offering Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) testing in all healthcare settings. This recommendation has not been widely implemented. This observational pilot study aimed to determine factors influencing patients' decision to accept or decline an HIV test and to identify barriers and facilitators to the feasibility of such a program. Study findings relevant to nursing are presented here.<br/><br/>Methods:<br/>The study was Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved and conducted in a Magnet-recognized community hospital from August to October, 2008. Demographic data was collected, interviews were conducted, and rapid HIV antibody testing was offered to consenting adults on medical and surgical care units. Interactions with nursing staff recorded during the study.<br/><br/>Findings: <br/>Initially, nurses appeared to be concerned about offering the test to patients. Requiring charge nurse involvement prior to approaching the patient was identified as a time barrier to recruitment. The support of nursing leadership helped to increase visibility of the study and in turn improved nursing participation. Nursing comfort level improved as the study progressed and patient experiences were positive. In turn, nurses began to refer patients to study personnel. <br/><br/>Discussion:<br/>Successful research ventures on patient care units require nurses to be agents for patient support and referral for testing. This was demonstrated in our study. Performing rapid HIV tests on inpatients avoids follow-up errors that so often occur in the outpatient setting. Whether the test is positive or negative, the process piloted herein helped to develop counseling and support skills by nurses who are familiar with all the resources in their institution, and who could ultimately mobilize a multidisciplinary team to individualize patient care. Given the limitations of this study, future research of nurses as an agent offering routine HIV testing in the inpatient setting would also be beneficial.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:15:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:15:11Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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