2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183120
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acute Care Nurse Practitioners: The Intensivist Theory
Author(s):
Wyckoff, Mary; Kaliff, Jennifer
Author Details:
Mary Wyckoff, PhD, MSN, ACNP, BC, ARNP, CCNS, CCRN, Jackson Health System, email: mwyckoff@jhsmiami.org; Jennifer Kaliff, MSN, ACNP, ACNP, BC
Abstract:
Purpose:
The role of the nurse practitioner is evolving to meet the needs of health care systems and patients. The mandate to limit physician residency hours in the United States has limited the availability of skilled care providers within the acute and critical care settings. Patients have increased acuity and require ongoing bedside management and intervention. The new complex patient has evolved from a few underlying conditions to a multidimensional patient with chronic conditions, post transplant, and long term sequelae, secondary to conditions that, in the past, would have been terminal. The critically chronically ill patient requires astute, detailed intervention.

Methods:
In critical care units, this requires high-quality, evidence-based bedside care. In the 40-bed SICU of a large academic medical center, the acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) group has grown from a single nurse practitioner to a group of 16. The role is expansive and encompasses bedside management, education of nurses and resident physicians, and multiple dimensions of family centered care. This role has required increased procedural skills including bedside percutaneous tracheostomy, pulmonary artery catheter placement, intubations, chest tubes and multiple other procedures.

Findings:
The ACNP's continuous bedside management has enhanced patient outcomes, changed the financial constraints, and decreased patient complications. The knowledge and ability to facilitate the recovery of critically ill individuals is based on organized strategic activity and continuity of care. This extensive role has resulted in the development of a critical care nurse practitioner internship. This program provides critical care experience to students within an acute care NP program.

Discussion:
The goal of this clinical presentation is to bring to the forefront the advantages of expanding the role of nurse practitioners within acute and critical care settings. This presentation will also highlight the benefits this new role holds for improving patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Magnet Hospitals of Florida; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Kissimmee, Florida
Description:
6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcute Care Nurse Practitioners: The Intensivist Theoryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWyckoff, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaliff, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Wyckoff, PhD, MSN, ACNP, BC, ARNP, CCNS, CCRN, Jackson Health System, email: mwyckoff@jhsmiami.org; Jennifer Kaliff, MSN, ACNP, ACNP, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183120-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:<br/>The role of the nurse practitioner is evolving to meet the needs of health care systems and patients. The mandate to limit physician residency hours in the United States has limited the availability of skilled care providers within the acute and critical care settings. Patients have increased acuity and require ongoing bedside management and intervention. The new complex patient has evolved from a few underlying conditions to a multidimensional patient with chronic conditions, post transplant, and long term sequelae, secondary to conditions that, in the past, would have been terminal. The critically chronically ill patient requires astute, detailed intervention. <br/><br/>Methods:<br/>In critical care units, this requires high-quality, evidence-based bedside care. In the 40-bed SICU of a large academic medical center, the acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) group has grown from a single nurse practitioner to a group of 16. The role is expansive and encompasses bedside management, education of nurses and resident physicians, and multiple dimensions of family centered care. This role has required increased procedural skills including bedside percutaneous tracheostomy, pulmonary artery catheter placement, intubations, chest tubes and multiple other procedures. <br/><br/>Findings:<br/>The ACNP's continuous bedside management has enhanced patient outcomes, changed the financial constraints, and decreased patient complications. The knowledge and ability to facilitate the recovery of critically ill individuals is based on organized strategic activity and continuity of care. This extensive role has resulted in the development of a critical care nurse practitioner internship. This program provides critical care experience to students within an acute care NP program. <br/><br/>Discussion:<br/>The goal of this clinical presentation is to bring to the forefront the advantages of expanding the role of nurse practitioners within acute and critical care settings. This presentation will also highlight the benefits this new role holds for improving patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:15:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:15:24Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostMagnet Hospitals of Floridaen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationKissimmee, Floridaen_US
dc.description6th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference � Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 12-13 February 2009 at Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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