2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183126
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of Visitation in Critical Care
Author(s):
Bernhardt-Tindal, Kim; Hart, A.
Author Details:
Kim Bernhardt-Tindal, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, Gaston Memorial Hospital, Gastonia, NC, email: tindalk@gmh.org; A. Hart
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore patient, family, and nursing perceptions of visitation guidelines in this 435 bed acute care hospital with 7 critical care units. The specific aim was to identify the variables that highly correlated with individual preferences of each group. The current visitation policy is two visitors for thirty minute intervals at 9:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 5:00 PM and 8:00 PM with no children under the age of 12 allowed. Method:
IRB approval was obtained from the hospital and UNC Charlotte. This study is a quantitative, descriptive, correlational design to determine patient, family, and nursing perspectives regarding different aspects of visitation guidelines. A consent form was attached to each survey to be completed by the patient, family member, or nurse. A survey could be completed each time a patient was transferred or discharged. The nurses were asked to complete the survey only one time. The data was collected for three months. Each survey was placed in a sealed envelope after completion to ensure confidentiality. A code book was used to organize the data and then the data was analyzed using SAS 9.1. Findings: Patients preferred to have no restrictions on visitation times. Younger patients wanted visitors more frequently. Of the patients surveyed, 42.5% wanted unlimited visitors while 43.6 % preferred two to three. Most preferred visiting hours to end by 10:00 PM. We found the majority of families followed the posted guidelines and were very satisfied although one third did not follow the guidelines. Families also requested no limit on the number of visitors or the length of time they visited. Nurses in the step down units were more open to longer hours than the ICU's. All units agreed the guidelines did not reflect actual practice. A large percentage of the ICU nurses felt the guidelines did not need to be modified. Discussion: Intensive Care Units are known for limited visitation policies which are usually more beneficial to staff than to patients. Nurses will ask visitors to leave if they feel it is detrimental to the patient's well being. Patients are often overlooked in determining optimal visitation guidelines. The literature has reported that the presence of family members has beneficial and healing effects on patients. No deleterious effects of visitation have been reported (Roland, et.al. 2001). Patients wanted more control over visitation, but not necessarily unrestricted times and should include rest period for patients. Family visitation should be more flexible, individualized, and open. Some nurses realize the current policy is not adequate, however, they fear making any changes. Healthcare personnel need to work with patients and families to tailor a plan to suite each family's unique circumstances. A schedule that fits everyone's needs including staff, will promote healing and enhanced communication. Currently a team is working to modify the visitation guidelines to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of Visitation in Critical Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBernhardt-Tindal, Kimen_US
dc.contributor.authorHart, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsKim Bernhardt-Tindal, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, Gaston Memorial Hospital, Gastonia, NC, email: tindalk@gmh.org; A. Harten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183126-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to explore patient, family, and nursing perceptions of visitation guidelines in this 435 bed acute care hospital with 7 critical care units. The specific aim was to identify the variables that highly correlated with individual preferences of each group. The current visitation policy is two visitors for thirty minute intervals at 9:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 5:00 PM and 8:00 PM with no children under the age of 12 allowed. Method: <br/>IRB approval was obtained from the hospital and UNC Charlotte. This study is a quantitative, descriptive, correlational design to determine patient, family, and nursing perspectives regarding different aspects of visitation guidelines. A consent form was attached to each survey to be completed by the patient, family member, or nurse. A survey could be completed each time a patient was transferred or discharged. The nurses were asked to complete the survey only one time. The data was collected for three months. Each survey was placed in a sealed envelope after completion to ensure confidentiality. A code book was used to organize the data and then the data was analyzed using SAS 9.1. Findings: Patients preferred to have no restrictions on visitation times. Younger patients wanted visitors more frequently. Of the patients surveyed, 42.5% wanted unlimited visitors while 43.6 % preferred two to three. Most preferred visiting hours to end by 10:00 PM. We found the majority of families followed the posted guidelines and were very satisfied although one third did not follow the guidelines. Families also requested no limit on the number of visitors or the length of time they visited. Nurses in the step down units were more open to longer hours than the ICU's. All units agreed the guidelines did not reflect actual practice. A large percentage of the ICU nurses felt the guidelines did not need to be modified. Discussion: Intensive Care Units are known for limited visitation policies which are usually more beneficial to staff than to patients. Nurses will ask visitors to leave if they feel it is detrimental to the patient's well being. Patients are often overlooked in determining optimal visitation guidelines. The literature has reported that the presence of family members has beneficial and healing effects on patients. No deleterious effects of visitation have been reported (Roland, et.al. 2001). Patients wanted more control over visitation, but not necessarily unrestricted times and should include rest period for patients. Family visitation should be more flexible, individualized, and open. Some nurses realize the current policy is not adequate, however, they fear making any changes. Healthcare personnel need to work with patients and families to tailor a plan to suite each family's unique circumstances. A schedule that fits everyone's needs including staff, will promote healing and enhanced communication. Currently a team is working to modify the visitation guidelines to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:15:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:15:39Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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