A Novel Approach to Pediatric Nursing Defibrillator Competencies Using Mid Fidelity Simulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183128
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Novel Approach to Pediatric Nursing Defibrillator Competencies Using Mid Fidelity Simulation
Author(s):
Bloom, Kathleen; Harman, J.; Brenan, B.; Alminde, C.; Halligan, M.
Author Details:
Kathleen Bloom, MSN, CPN, RN-BC, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, email: kathleen.bloom@tenethealth.com; J. Harman; B. Brenan; C. Alminde; M. Halligan
Abstract:
Purpose: Pediatric codes and other life threatening arrhythmias are infrequent events but when they occur immediate and competent response is essential to the outcome. Because of this, it is a challenge to maintain and measure clinical competency in the use of the defibrillator in a pediatric institution. Competency evaluation of the nursing staff is a mandated requirement for practice yet there is no clear defined method of measuring or validating continuing competence. We proposed that use of mid fidelity simulation would be a more effective method. Methods: Our medical/surgical unit nurses were divided into two groups. One group (MS1) had defibrillator competencies performed in a traditional fashion with an instructor reviewing use of the machine and observing the nurse perform the required steps. The other group (MS2) was taught with a scripted code scenario using a mid-fidelity simulator (Laerdal Mega Code Kid) with the instructor instructing and observing the nurse perform the steps in the scenario. We then retested each group 6 months later in one of two standardized scenarios requiring them to defibrillate or cardiovert twice, observing their times to task completion. Results In the scenario requiring defibrillation 10 participants were in MS1, 7 were in MS2. Time to first shock was 69.9sec for MS1, 47.2sec for MS2 (p<0.2) and time to second shock was 56.9sec for MS1, and 42.3sec for MS2 (p<0.27). For the scenario requiring cardioversion 6 participants were from MS1, 4 participants were from MS2. Time to first shock was 94sec for MS1, 101sec for MS2 (p<0.74) and time to second shock was 71.1sec for MS1 and 40.75 for MS2 (p<0.08). Discussion: Because of the small sample size our numbers did not approach statistical significance, but there was a reduction in time for defibrillation and the second shock in the cardioversion scenario. The recommendations for early defibrillation from American Heart are clear and while the difference may not be statistically significant, clinically it may be very significant in an emergency where every second counts. Teaching defibrillator competencies using simulation improves the time to delivery of shock over tradition review methods.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Novel Approach to Pediatric Nursing Defibrillator Competencies Using Mid Fidelity Simulationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBloom, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarman, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrenan, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlminde, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHalligan, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Bloom, MSN, CPN, RN-BC, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, email: kathleen.bloom@tenethealth.com; J. Harman; B. Brenan; C. Alminde; M. Halliganen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183128-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Pediatric codes and other life threatening arrhythmias are infrequent events but when they occur immediate and competent response is essential to the outcome. Because of this, it is a challenge to maintain and measure clinical competency in the use of the defibrillator in a pediatric institution. Competency evaluation of the nursing staff is a mandated requirement for practice yet there is no clear defined method of measuring or validating continuing competence. We proposed that use of mid fidelity simulation would be a more effective method. Methods: Our medical/surgical unit nurses were divided into two groups. One group (MS1) had defibrillator competencies performed in a traditional fashion with an instructor reviewing use of the machine and observing the nurse perform the required steps. The other group (MS2) was taught with a scripted code scenario using a mid-fidelity simulator (Laerdal Mega Code Kid) with the instructor instructing and observing the nurse perform the steps in the scenario. We then retested each group 6 months later in one of two standardized scenarios requiring them to defibrillate or cardiovert twice, observing their times to task completion. Results In the scenario requiring defibrillation 10 participants were in MS1, 7 were in MS2. Time to first shock was 69.9sec for MS1, 47.2sec for MS2 (p&lt;0.2) and time to second shock was 56.9sec for MS1, and 42.3sec for MS2 (p&lt;0.27). For the scenario requiring cardioversion 6 participants were from MS1, 4 participants were from MS2. Time to first shock was 94sec for MS1, 101sec for MS2 (p&lt;0.74) and time to second shock was 71.1sec for MS1 and 40.75 for MS2 (p&lt;0.08). Discussion: Because of the small sample size our numbers did not approach statistical significance, but there was a reduction in time for defibrillation and the second shock in the cardioversion scenario. The recommendations for early defibrillation from American Heart are clear and while the difference may not be statistically significant, clinically it may be very significant in an emergency where every second counts. Teaching defibrillator competencies using simulation improves the time to delivery of shock over tradition review methods.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:15:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:15:44Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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