15.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183138
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Higher Nursing Education on Patient Outcomes
Author(s):
DeJesus, Fanya
Author Details:
Fanya DeJesus, MBS, MSN, RN, Baptist Medical Center South, Jacksonville, FL, email: Fanya.Dejesus@bmcjax.com
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to examine the relationship between nursing education level and patient outcomes specific to the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. The goal was to review retrospective data on nursing education and pressure ulcer prevalence and determine if a correlation existed between the variables. Historically, there have been published documents supporting the BSN nurse as the most appropriate entry level into nursing. Martha Rogers, nurse theorist and proponent of higher education, proclaimed that the professional nurse is the BSN nurse and alleged that nurse education level does affect patient outcomes. Method: This study included data from nine medical surgical units reporting pressure ulcer prevalence for 1728 patients and the educational level of 300 registered nurses. Pearson's correlational statistical model was used to explore the relationship between nursing education level and hospital acquired pressure ulcer prevalence. Data on pressure ulcers and nursing education level is collected quarterly, at a set point in time, and reported to the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI). This study included a retrospective review of this data during the time period of January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2007. This data was entered into a spreadsheet and reviewed for correlation between the two variables with the aim of describing the relationship between nursing education and patient outcome, specific to hospital acquired pressure ulcer prevalence through the use of a multiple regression analytical model. Findings and Discussion: The researcher in this correlational descriptive study identified a significant correlation between nursing education level and the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Significance was tested using a p value of .05. Data analysis revealed a significance score of .004 and a correlation coefficient of -.342. Data revealed an inverse relationship between nursing education level and the prevalence of pressure ulcers. The researcher concluded that the higher the percentage of BSN nurses, the lower the percentage of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Equipped with knowledge of the impact of higher nursing education and patient outcomes, nursing leaders can proactively participate in patient outcomes as they hire professional nurses to deliver quality care.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Higher Nursing Education on Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeJesus, Fanyaen_US
dc.author.detailsFanya DeJesus, MBS, MSN, RN, Baptist Medical Center South, Jacksonville, FL, email: Fanya.Dejesus@bmcjax.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183138-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research study was to examine the relationship between nursing education level and patient outcomes specific to the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. The goal was to review retrospective data on nursing education and pressure ulcer prevalence and determine if a correlation existed between the variables. Historically, there have been published documents supporting the BSN nurse as the most appropriate entry level into nursing. Martha Rogers, nurse theorist and proponent of higher education, proclaimed that the professional nurse is the BSN nurse and alleged that nurse education level does affect patient outcomes. Method: This study included data from nine medical surgical units reporting pressure ulcer prevalence for 1728 patients and the educational level of 300 registered nurses. Pearson's correlational statistical model was used to explore the relationship between nursing education level and hospital acquired pressure ulcer prevalence. Data on pressure ulcers and nursing education level is collected quarterly, at a set point in time, and reported to the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI). This study included a retrospective review of this data during the time period of January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2007. This data was entered into a spreadsheet and reviewed for correlation between the two variables with the aim of describing the relationship between nursing education and patient outcome, specific to hospital acquired pressure ulcer prevalence through the use of a multiple regression analytical model. Findings and Discussion: The researcher in this correlational descriptive study identified a significant correlation between nursing education level and the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Significance was tested using a p value of .05. Data analysis revealed a significance score of .004 and a correlation coefficient of -.342. Data revealed an inverse relationship between nursing education level and the prevalence of pressure ulcers. The researcher concluded that the higher the percentage of BSN nurses, the lower the percentage of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Equipped with knowledge of the impact of higher nursing education and patient outcomes, nursing leaders can proactively participate in patient outcomes as they hire professional nurses to deliver quality care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:10Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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