2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183139
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Central Venous Access Devices: A Study of Oncology Nurses' Troubleshooting Techniques
Author(s):
Ferrall, Sheila; Boyington, A.; Mason, T.
Author Details:
Shelia Ferrall, RN, MS, AOCN, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, email: Shelia.Ferrall@moffitt.org; A. Boyington; T. Mason
Abstract:
Purpose: Although guidelines for the prevention and management of catheter-related infections based on the best evidence are available to oncology nurses, less is known about an intervention to prevent thrombotic complications that lead to catheter occlusion. Definitive guidelines related to the prevention or management of thrombotic complications are not available. While experienced oncology nurses identify a number of techniques employed when an occlusion is suspected, research studies regarding independent, non-invasive techniques used by nurses for troubleshooting occluded central venous access devices (CVADs) were not found in the literature. The purpose of this study is twofold. The first is to explore techniques reported by experienced oncology nurses for troubleshooting an occluded CVAD and the second to describe nurses' perceived effectiveness of the troubleshooting techniques. Method: A cross-sectional exploratory survey design will be used to investigate the venous access troubleshooting techniques of experienced oncology nurses.
Sample: Registered Nurse members (n=4720) of an oncology nursing professional organization who meet the following classification per self-report: greater than 5 years oncology experience, primary specialty of biotherapy/chemotherapy, and outpatient infusion will be solicited to complete the electronic questionnaire.
Instrument: An investigator-developed survey questionnaire the Central Venous Access Devices: Troubleshooting Techniques Questionnaire (CVAD: TTQ) will be used. Data Collection: Each nurse will receive a letter to participate in the study. A link to the survey and a password will be contained within the "invitation to participate" letter. Two weeks after the initial mailing, a follow-up thank you postcard will be mailed to serve as a message of appreciation to those who have completed the survey and as a reminder to those who have not. Pilot Study: Prior to embarking on the large scale study described, a pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the (a) ease of completing the online survey; (b) clarity of instructions, and (c) data collection process. A descriptive exploratory design was used. A convenience sample of 127 nurses working in an oncology setting was invited to complete the electronic questionnaire for the pilot study. Protection of Human Subjects: Both the pilot study and parent study were approved by the institution?s Scientific Review Committee and Institutional Review Board. Findings of the Pilot Study: All nurses (n = 26) reported using: ask patients to take deep breaths; ask patient to raise and or move arm; ask patient to sit up; and instill a thrombolytic agent. Respondents consider instill a thrombolytic agent as the most effective technique with the following non-invasive techniques ranked as the next 3 for effectiveness: ask patient to lie down; ask patient to take deep breath; ask patient to cough. No usability issues were reported in the pilot study. The parent study is underway. Preliminary analysis will be presented. Discussion: The pilot study established that the CVAD: TTQ items are appropriate and that nurses use and find effective non-invasive techniques. Electronic administration of the CVAD: TTQ is feasible. These findings were preparatory to the current national survey of oncology nurses, our next step in development of an evidence-based approach to troubleshooting occluded CVADs.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCentral Venous Access Devices: A Study of Oncology Nurses' Troubleshooting Techniquesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrall, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoyington, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMason, T.en_US
dc.author.detailsShelia Ferrall, RN, MS, AOCN, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, email: Shelia.Ferrall@moffitt.org; A. Boyington; T. Masonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183139-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although guidelines for the prevention and management of catheter-related infections based on the best evidence are available to oncology nurses, less is known about an intervention to prevent thrombotic complications that lead to catheter occlusion. Definitive guidelines related to the prevention or management of thrombotic complications are not available. While experienced oncology nurses identify a number of techniques employed when an occlusion is suspected, research studies regarding independent, non-invasive techniques used by nurses for troubleshooting occluded central venous access devices (CVADs) were not found in the literature. The purpose of this study is twofold. The first is to explore techniques reported by experienced oncology nurses for troubleshooting an occluded CVAD and the second to describe nurses' perceived effectiveness of the troubleshooting techniques. Method: A cross-sectional exploratory survey design will be used to investigate the venous access troubleshooting techniques of experienced oncology nurses. <br/>Sample: Registered Nurse members (n=4720) of an oncology nursing professional organization who meet the following classification per self-report: greater than 5 years oncology experience, primary specialty of biotherapy/chemotherapy, and outpatient infusion will be solicited to complete the electronic questionnaire. <br/>Instrument: An investigator-developed survey questionnaire the Central Venous Access Devices: Troubleshooting Techniques Questionnaire (CVAD: TTQ) will be used. Data Collection: Each nurse will receive a letter to participate in the study. A link to the survey and a password will be contained within the &quot;invitation to participate&quot; letter. Two weeks after the initial mailing, a follow-up thank you postcard will be mailed to serve as a message of appreciation to those who have completed the survey and as a reminder to those who have not. Pilot Study: Prior to embarking on the large scale study described, a pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the (a) ease of completing the online survey; (b) clarity of instructions, and (c) data collection process. A descriptive exploratory design was used. A convenience sample of 127 nurses working in an oncology setting was invited to complete the electronic questionnaire for the pilot study. Protection of Human Subjects: Both the pilot study and parent study were approved by the institution?s Scientific Review Committee and Institutional Review Board. Findings of the Pilot Study: All nurses (n = 26) reported using: ask patients to take deep breaths; ask patient to raise and or move arm; ask patient to sit up; and instill a thrombolytic agent. Respondents consider instill a thrombolytic agent as the most effective technique with the following non-invasive techniques ranked as the next 3 for effectiveness: ask patient to lie down; ask patient to take deep breath; ask patient to cough. No usability issues were reported in the pilot study. The parent study is underway. Preliminary analysis will be presented. Discussion: The pilot study established that the CVAD: TTQ items are appropriate and that nurses use and find effective non-invasive techniques. Electronic administration of the CVAD: TTQ is feasible. These findings were preparatory to the current national survey of oncology nurses, our next step in development of an evidence-based approach to troubleshooting occluded CVADs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:13Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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