2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183143
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Action Plan to Decrease Blood Culture Contamination Rates In the Medical Intensive Care Unit
Author(s):
Gambrel, Kerri
Author Details:
Kerri Gambrel, RN, CCRN, Lakeland Regional Medical Center, Lakeland, FL, email: Kerri.Gambrel@lrmc.com
Abstract:
Purpose: Blood culture contamination represents an ongoing source of frustration for clinicians. Ambiguous results can lead to increased cost, inappropriate therapy, extended length of stay, and potential for sub-optimal outcomes (Ernst, 2004). The national average of contamination is 3% with an average cost of $5000 per contaminated specimen. The purpose of this project was to explore the question, "What innovations in knowledge of and techniques in our current blood culture collection process could we as Registered Nurses implement to improve our contamination outcomes?" Methods: After literature and policy review there was discussion with all staff members regarding the effect of blood culture contamination as described above. Emphasis was placed on hand washing and following the steps exactly as prescribed in the blood culture collection policy (no omissions or short-cuts), treating the procedure as a "sterile procedure" with emphasis on setup and masking for the procedure, and follow-up with every nurse who was involved in collection of a contaminated culture to debrief about what might have contributed to the contamination. Findings: As a result of this project, the following outcomes were realized: increased accountability, increased awareness, decreased delay in care, decreased cost, decreased length of stay, and an overall decrease in contamination rate over the next seven months by 62.5 % for the unit and an 51% overall hospital wide after the unit's results were shared with the leadership of the nursing staff. Discussion: In review of our efforts to provide better outcomes for our patients, there came a realization that the Registered Nurse at the bedside had the potential to greatly impact these outcomes. After the information was shared with the Registered Nurses in the Medical Intensive Care Unit, the increased awareness provided the mechanism for improved communication and increased accountability. Increasing awareness of the impact on patient outcomes related to delay in treatment, appropriate therapy, and associated costs and sharing of current related research resulted in a culture shift that created an environment of nursing excellence through empowerment and ownership of individual professional practice.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAction Plan to Decrease Blood Culture Contamination Rates In the Medical Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorGambrel, Kerrien_US
dc.author.detailsKerri Gambrel, RN, CCRN, Lakeland Regional Medical Center, Lakeland, FL, email: Kerri.Gambrel@lrmc.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183143-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Blood culture contamination represents an ongoing source of frustration for clinicians. Ambiguous results can lead to increased cost, inappropriate therapy, extended length of stay, and potential for sub-optimal outcomes (Ernst, 2004). The national average of contamination is 3% with an average cost of $5000 per contaminated specimen. The purpose of this project was to explore the question, "What innovations in knowledge of and techniques in our current blood culture collection process could we as Registered Nurses implement to improve our contamination outcomes?" Methods: After literature and policy review there was discussion with all staff members regarding the effect of blood culture contamination as described above. Emphasis was placed on hand washing and following the steps exactly as prescribed in the blood culture collection policy (no omissions or short-cuts), treating the procedure as a "sterile procedure" with emphasis on setup and masking for the procedure, and follow-up with every nurse who was involved in collection of a contaminated culture to debrief about what might have contributed to the contamination. Findings: As a result of this project, the following outcomes were realized: increased accountability, increased awareness, decreased delay in care, decreased cost, decreased length of stay, and an overall decrease in contamination rate over the next seven months by 62.5 % for the unit and an 51% overall hospital wide after the unit's results were shared with the leadership of the nursing staff. Discussion: In review of our efforts to provide better outcomes for our patients, there came a realization that the Registered Nurse at the bedside had the potential to greatly impact these outcomes. After the information was shared with the Registered Nurses in the Medical Intensive Care Unit, the increased awareness provided the mechanism for improved communication and increased accountability. Increasing awareness of the impact on patient outcomes related to delay in treatment, appropriate therapy, and associated costs and sharing of current related research resulted in a culture shift that created an environment of nursing excellence through empowerment and ownership of individual professional practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:23Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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