2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183146
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal Program Improves Breastfeeding Compliance in the NICU
Author(s):
Gordon, Jessica
Author Details:
Jessica Gordon, MS, ARNP, CPNP-PC, St. Joseph's Women's Hospital, Tampa, FL, email: jessie.79@verizon.net
Abstract:
Purpose: Research has proven that prematurity exposes infants to severe neonatal health problems such as necrotizing enter- colitis (NEC), sepsis and retinopathy. Of the vast forms of medical technology available to reduce these complications, human milk feedings have been found to be the most beneficial and cost effective. Regrettably, with all the evidence based research that supports breast milk as the gold standard for premature infants, breastfeeding compliance for postpartum mothers of premature infants in a hospital located in the southeastern region of the United States, are significantly lower than women who birth healthy term infants. The Mother's Own Milk Program, a perinatal intervention program, aims to increase short and long term breastfeeding compliance of the mothers who birth premature infants. Improvements in breastfeeding compliance is not only expected to increase the supply of maternal breast milk fed to premature infants, it is also expected to improve maternal-child attachment, reduce and prevent neonatal complications and significantly reduce health care cost for families and hospitals by decreasing neonatal length of stay, equipment use and supplies. Method: This pilot study engaged, educated and enrolled High Risk Obstetric long-term inpatients with a minimum of 25 weeks gestational age and diagnoses that warrant premature delivery. Enrolled participants received one-on-one and/or group perinatal education on preventing premature delivery, neonatal development, and breastfeeding/pumping techniques. After delivery, participants were referred to a lactation specialist and given a pump log to document pumping compliance and milk supply daily. Shortly after maternal discharge, participants were contacted 7 days, 30 days and 60 days post delivery for lactation assistance through the duration of the infants NICU stay. Findings: There were 44 participants eligible for the pilot. 4 declined to participate. 62% of the remaining participants, delivered premature infants less then 37 weeks gestational age that required hospitalization in the NICU. Year-to-date data concluded that 100% of the 27 participants complied with breastfeeding or breast pumping at the time of maternal discharge. Seven days post delivery 100 % still remained complaint. Long term compliance declined to 85% 30 days after maternal discharge and 76% compliance 60 days after maternal discharge. Despite the declination, 52% of the neonates successfully transitioned to breastfeed, a marked improvement from 1 % in 2008. Discussion: Prenatal lactation education, along with continued lactation support, increased short term breastfeeding compliance of mothers with NICU newborns. Prospective variables needing further validation for contributing to the declination of long term compliance include low milk supply, cultural differences, limited resources, lack of previous breastfeeding experience and minimal lactation support from peers, nurses and healthcare providers. More frequent patient follow-up may be needed to mediate these variables in future studies.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal Program Improves Breastfeeding Compliance in the NICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Jessicaen_US
dc.author.detailsJessica Gordon, MS, ARNP, CPNP-PC, St. Joseph's Women's Hospital, Tampa, FL, email: jessie.79@verizon.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183146-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Research has proven that prematurity exposes infants to severe neonatal health problems such as necrotizing enter- colitis (NEC), sepsis and retinopathy. Of the vast forms of medical technology available to reduce these complications, human milk feedings have been found to be the most beneficial and cost effective. Regrettably, with all the evidence based research that supports breast milk as the gold standard for premature infants, breastfeeding compliance for postpartum mothers of premature infants in a hospital located in the southeastern region of the United States, are significantly lower than women who birth healthy term infants. The Mother's Own Milk Program, a perinatal intervention program, aims to increase short and long term breastfeeding compliance of the mothers who birth premature infants. Improvements in breastfeeding compliance is not only expected to increase the supply of maternal breast milk fed to premature infants, it is also expected to improve maternal-child attachment, reduce and prevent neonatal complications and significantly reduce health care cost for families and hospitals by decreasing neonatal length of stay, equipment use and supplies. Method: This pilot study engaged, educated and enrolled High Risk Obstetric long-term inpatients with a minimum of 25 weeks gestational age and diagnoses that warrant premature delivery. Enrolled participants received one-on-one and/or group perinatal education on preventing premature delivery, neonatal development, and breastfeeding/pumping techniques. After delivery, participants were referred to a lactation specialist and given a pump log to document pumping compliance and milk supply daily. Shortly after maternal discharge, participants were contacted 7 days, 30 days and 60 days post delivery for lactation assistance through the duration of the infants NICU stay. Findings: There were 44 participants eligible for the pilot. 4 declined to participate. 62% of the remaining participants, delivered premature infants less then 37 weeks gestational age that required hospitalization in the NICU. Year-to-date data concluded that 100% of the 27 participants complied with breastfeeding or breast pumping at the time of maternal discharge. Seven days post delivery 100 % still remained complaint. Long term compliance declined to 85% 30 days after maternal discharge and 76% compliance 60 days after maternal discharge. Despite the declination, 52% of the neonates successfully transitioned to breastfeed, a marked improvement from 1 % in 2008. Discussion: Prenatal lactation education, along with continued lactation support, increased short term breastfeeding compliance of mothers with NICU newborns. Prospective variables needing further validation for contributing to the declination of long term compliance include low milk supply, cultural differences, limited resources, lack of previous breastfeeding experience and minimal lactation support from peers, nurses and healthcare providers. More frequent patient follow-up may be needed to mediate these variables in future studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:31Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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