Best Practice at the Point of Care Category Using SHOC (Student Hand Off communication) to Make Nurses Listen

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183147
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Best Practice at the Point of Care Category Using SHOC (Student Hand Off communication) to Make Nurses Listen
Author(s):
Gore, Angela; Warden, L.
Author Details:
Angela Gore, BSN, VA Nursing Academy, Oklahoma City, email: Angela-D-Gore@ouhsc.edu; L. Warden
Abstract:
Purpose: Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) cohorts enrolled at the University of Oklahoma College of Nursing (OUCON) baccalaureate program participate in ongoing efforts to improve communication and reduce circumstances associated with error. The Institutes of Medicine as well as nursing literature document that the blame game is still a repercussion of nursing error. Nursing students do not possess the critical thinking skills that divert many potential errors, and since nurses fear punitive actions associated with patient error, students can be easy targets for blame. The purpose of the SHOC (Student Hand off Communication) form is to mirror the Joint Commission's 2009 Patient Safety Goal of Improving the effectiveness of communication among caregivers. The SBAR (Situation Background Assessment and Recommendation) form developed for the aviation industry is a tool proven to improve communication and prevent error; however, student reports require prompting. The SHOC (Student Hand off Communication) tool effectively meets SBAR standards as well as prompts first year baccalaureate students to prioritize and sequence important care information. Method: The SHOC form effectively parallels the shift report sequence that Veteran Affairs hospital medical/ surgical staff nurses utilize on a daily basis. More importantly, students have the nurses they are reporting off to sign the SHOC form. VANA nursing instructors copy the report forms with the nurses' signatures in order to refer back when there are discrepancies in care. When nurses sign the tool, they are admitting that they are informed about the previous care given to this patient during the interim period. The report form does not become part of the patient's formal record, and the copies of the SHOC form do not leave a secured area within the hospital. After two to three days, copies of the SHOC form are placed in the shredder box. Findings: Face to face report and Hand Off communication tools protect the student and solve problems associated with patient error within a teaching facility. Staff nurses report that the SHOC form produces exceptional student reports and surpasses previous student expectations when care is handed off to another health care team member. Staff nurses are relieved to possess the SHOC form as a concrete reminder of vital care rendered by students. Medication errors are diverted, and there is no question when the last medication was administered by the student because this information is also included within the report tool. Discussion: Many students are not able to communicate pertinent care information either in verbal or written fashion without guidance. Research demonstrates that verbal communication is problematic among health care providers. Students are often overlooked in the communication policy process. Teaching hospitals and colleges of nursing are encouraged to collaborate across institutions for the purpose of standardizing student communication and promoting Hands Off communication early in the nursing education process.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBest Practice at the Point of Care Category Using SHOC (Student Hand Off communication) to Make Nurses Listenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGore, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWarden, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsAngela Gore, BSN, VA Nursing Academy, Oklahoma City, email: Angela-D-Gore@ouhsc.edu; L. Wardenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183147-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) cohorts enrolled at the University of Oklahoma College of Nursing (OUCON) baccalaureate program participate in ongoing efforts to improve communication and reduce circumstances associated with error. The Institutes of Medicine as well as nursing literature document that the blame game is still a repercussion of nursing error. Nursing students do not possess the critical thinking skills that divert many potential errors, and since nurses fear punitive actions associated with patient error, students can be easy targets for blame. The purpose of the SHOC (Student Hand off Communication) form is to mirror the Joint Commission's 2009 Patient Safety Goal of Improving the effectiveness of communication among caregivers. The SBAR (Situation Background Assessment and Recommendation) form developed for the aviation industry is a tool proven to improve communication and prevent error; however, student reports require prompting. The SHOC (Student Hand off Communication) tool effectively meets SBAR standards as well as prompts first year baccalaureate students to prioritize and sequence important care information. Method: The SHOC form effectively parallels the shift report sequence that Veteran Affairs hospital medical/ surgical staff nurses utilize on a daily basis. More importantly, students have the nurses they are reporting off to sign the SHOC form. VANA nursing instructors copy the report forms with the nurses' signatures in order to refer back when there are discrepancies in care. When nurses sign the tool, they are admitting that they are informed about the previous care given to this patient during the interim period. The report form does not become part of the patient's formal record, and the copies of the SHOC form do not leave a secured area within the hospital. After two to three days, copies of the SHOC form are placed in the shredder box. Findings: Face to face report and Hand Off communication tools protect the student and solve problems associated with patient error within a teaching facility. Staff nurses report that the SHOC form produces exceptional student reports and surpasses previous student expectations when care is handed off to another health care team member. Staff nurses are relieved to possess the SHOC form as a concrete reminder of vital care rendered by students. Medication errors are diverted, and there is no question when the last medication was administered by the student because this information is also included within the report tool. Discussion: Many students are not able to communicate pertinent care information either in verbal or written fashion without guidance. Research demonstrates that verbal communication is problematic among health care providers. Students are often overlooked in the communication policy process. Teaching hospitals and colleges of nursing are encouraged to collaborate across institutions for the purpose of standardizing student communication and promoting Hands Off communication early in the nursing education process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:33Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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