2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183149
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Medication Boxes with Elderly Veterans
Author(s):
Hicks, Lou Etta; Flaugher, M.; Maurer, S.
Author Details:
Lou Etta Hicks, MSN, ARNP, GNP-BC, Bay Pines VA Healthcare System, Bay Pines, FL, email: LouEtta.Hicks@va.gov; M. Flaugher; S. Maurer
Abstract:
Our current population is living longer with the advancement of medications and with the focus on preventative health. However, as older people age, there is an increase in the number of medications prescribed used to help maintain their health. Veterans who have multiple co-morbid conditions are often prescribed polypharmacy leading to a national awareness of the risks and costs associated with this practice. Polypharmacy has been attributed directly and indirectly to health issues that can be life threatening for the older population. Limited information exists on interventions that can be utilized to lessen the risk of ill health effects related to polypharmacy. A current item used is the medication box which comes in all sizes and forms. Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to describe older veterans? impressions about the medication boxes currently used in their home care setting and to determine what kind of medication box would best serve the older population. Method: Setting: Veteran subjects were selected who were currently enrolled in Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) who used medication boxes for medication management. Study Population: Veteran subjects between the ages of 71 to 88 years old who scored >19 on SLUMS if they had not graduated from high school or >21 if they did graduate from high school. Tool: The Principal Investigator (an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner) administered an investigator developed questionnaire that consisted of 19 questions after obtaining a signed consent form in their home. Other Information: Additional information was collected using chart review such as age, diagnoses, demographic data, etc. Findings: Statistical analysis was done using descriptive data to summarize individual percentage of results for each question. The results showed that one subject found the medication box lids difficult to open. However, the majority of veterans (96%) stated that they were satisfied with their current medication box. The average number of prescribed medications was 18 with 30 being the most prescribed and 5 being the least. Seventy percent stated that the reason they felt they needed to use a medication box was due to too many medications while 30% found that they had frequent medication changes. Those veterans who received their medication box from the VA were 70%. Of those who chose to obtain their medication box elsewhere, 43% stated that they felt the VA medication box was too big and 29% liked only the weekly strips. Seventy percent of the veterans reported that the HBPC nurse taught them how to prefill their own medication boxes. Veterans commented that they like the individual slots in the medication boxes that could be removed for portability issues. Also, clear tops were easier for older individuals to see the pills inside the box as opposed to the colored or translucent tops. One subject did comment that the pills would be easier to remove if the bottoms of the slots were rounded as opposed to being square bottoms. Discussion: The majority of subjects enrolled in the study were satisfied with their medication boxes and medication management through HBPC. Descriptive data did reveal the current use of VA medication boxes were appropriate for the majority of veterans studied with mild cognitive deficits in this age group. If older subjects with moderate to severe cognitive deficits had been included, the investigator may have noted problems with the use of the current medication boxes. The results of this study support the use of medication boxes as a cost efficient way to assist the elderly in taking their medications appropriately. Additionally, medication boxes are a way to help prevent potential health problems and undue costly hospitalizations associated with polypharmacy in the elderly.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Medication Boxes with Elderly Veteransen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Lou Ettaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFlaugher, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMaurer, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsLou Etta Hicks, MSN, ARNP, GNP-BC, Bay Pines VA Healthcare System, Bay Pines, FL, email: LouEtta.Hicks@va.gov; M. Flaugher; S. Maureren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183149-
dc.description.abstractOur current population is living longer with the advancement of medications and with the focus on preventative health. However, as older people age, there is an increase in the number of medications prescribed used to help maintain their health. Veterans who have multiple co-morbid conditions are often prescribed polypharmacy leading to a national awareness of the risks and costs associated with this practice. Polypharmacy has been attributed directly and indirectly to health issues that can be life threatening for the older population. Limited information exists on interventions that can be utilized to lessen the risk of ill health effects related to polypharmacy. A current item used is the medication box which comes in all sizes and forms. Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to describe older veterans? impressions about the medication boxes currently used in their home care setting and to determine what kind of medication box would best serve the older population. Method: Setting: Veteran subjects were selected who were currently enrolled in Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) who used medication boxes for medication management. Study Population: Veteran subjects between the ages of 71 to 88 years old who scored >19 on SLUMS if they had not graduated from high school or >21 if they did graduate from high school. Tool: The Principal Investigator (an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner) administered an investigator developed questionnaire that consisted of 19 questions after obtaining a signed consent form in their home. Other Information: Additional information was collected using chart review such as age, diagnoses, demographic data, etc. Findings: Statistical analysis was done using descriptive data to summarize individual percentage of results for each question. The results showed that one subject found the medication box lids difficult to open. However, the majority of veterans (96%) stated that they were satisfied with their current medication box. The average number of prescribed medications was 18 with 30 being the most prescribed and 5 being the least. Seventy percent stated that the reason they felt they needed to use a medication box was due to too many medications while 30% found that they had frequent medication changes. Those veterans who received their medication box from the VA were 70%. Of those who chose to obtain their medication box elsewhere, 43% stated that they felt the VA medication box was too big and 29% liked only the weekly strips. Seventy percent of the veterans reported that the HBPC nurse taught them how to prefill their own medication boxes. Veterans commented that they like the individual slots in the medication boxes that could be removed for portability issues. Also, clear tops were easier for older individuals to see the pills inside the box as opposed to the colored or translucent tops. One subject did comment that the pills would be easier to remove if the bottoms of the slots were rounded as opposed to being square bottoms. Discussion: The majority of subjects enrolled in the study were satisfied with their medication boxes and medication management through HBPC. Descriptive data did reveal the current use of VA medication boxes were appropriate for the majority of veterans studied with mild cognitive deficits in this age group. If older subjects with moderate to severe cognitive deficits had been included, the investigator may have noted problems with the use of the current medication boxes. The results of this study support the use of medication boxes as a cost efficient way to assist the elderly in taking their medications appropriately. Additionally, medication boxes are a way to help prevent potential health problems and undue costly hospitalizations associated with polypharmacy in the elderly.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:39Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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