2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183155
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Noise Reduction on an Acute Care Nursing Unit
Author(s):
Lindgren, Carol; Thomasos, E.
Author Details:
Carol Lindgren, RN, PhD, Doctors Hospital, Coral Gables, FL, email: CarolynL@baptisthealth.net; E. Thomasos
Abstract:
Introduction: Hospital noise is a major complaint from staff and patients. Average sound levels in hospital patient environments have increased from 57 decibels to 72 decibels since 1960 despite the World Health Organization's recommendation that levels in patients' rooms should not exceed 35 decibels. (Abidov, 2005). Busch-Vishniac (2005) found that excessive noise in hospital leads to stressed workers, increased incidence of errors and interference with healing and recovery. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to identify the noise levels on a telemetry unit of a 200 bed community hospital, and the effectiveness of the interventions to reduce the noise levels. Method: Design: This was a noise prevention intervention study using pre- and post-test measures of noise levels conducted on a busy Telemetry floor at Doctors Hospital in Coral Gables from September to November, 2009. A literature review provided data to compare the decibel levels of noise sources with environmental noise and OSHA in-hospital recommendations. Sample: The sample consisted of various noise sources of one telemetry unit of Doctors Hospital that included, but not limited to, squeaking/banging doors, portable workstations, pill crushers, telephones, floor cleaners and verbal exchange on the unit. Procedures: The decibel levels of the sources of noise were taken at shift change and at 10:00 hours, using the Extech Sound Level Alert, Model SL 130 dosimeter, that was installed in the nurses' station. Pre test noise levels were measured and compared to OSHA Daily Permissible Noise Level Exposure recommendations. Interventions addressed the excessive decibels of pill crushers, squeaky/banging doors and loud talking. Signage was used to educate staff to speak softly. Data Analysis: A comparative table was constructed detailing the data results and the equivalent environmental noise source. Changes in pre- and post-intervention decibels were charted. Findings: Noise levels were reduced in the areas where interventions were implemented. After the installation of silencers, the noise from the banging kitchen door was reduced from 70.4 decibels to 61.9. Pill crusher levels were reduced from 86.5 to less than 30 decibels. Banging patient door noise ranged from 95.4 to 101.9 at the pre test and was reduced to a mean of 63 decibels. Although verbal noise was not specifically identifiable, signage and the noise meter increased the awareness of noise pollution by the staff. Discussion: Further noise tests and interventions will be implemented. The study illustrated the feasibility of conducting noise level measurements and taking steps to decrease noise levels.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNoise Reduction on an Acute Care Nursing Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorLindgren, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomasos, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Lindgren, RN, PhD, Doctors Hospital, Coral Gables, FL, email: CarolynL@baptisthealth.net; E. Thomasosen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183155-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Hospital noise is a major complaint from staff and patients. Average sound levels in hospital patient environments have increased from 57 decibels to 72 decibels since 1960 despite the World Health Organization's recommendation that levels in patients' rooms should not exceed 35 decibels. (Abidov, 2005). Busch-Vishniac (2005) found that excessive noise in hospital leads to stressed workers, increased incidence of errors and interference with healing and recovery. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to identify the noise levels on a telemetry unit of a 200 bed community hospital, and the effectiveness of the interventions to reduce the noise levels. Method: Design: This was a noise prevention intervention study using pre- and post-test measures of noise levels conducted on a busy Telemetry floor at Doctors Hospital in Coral Gables from September to November, 2009. A literature review provided data to compare the decibel levels of noise sources with environmental noise and OSHA in-hospital recommendations. Sample: The sample consisted of various noise sources of one telemetry unit of Doctors Hospital that included, but not limited to, squeaking/banging doors, portable workstations, pill crushers, telephones, floor cleaners and verbal exchange on the unit. Procedures: The decibel levels of the sources of noise were taken at shift change and at 10:00 hours, using the Extech Sound Level Alert, Model SL 130 dosimeter, that was installed in the nurses' station. Pre test noise levels were measured and compared to OSHA Daily Permissible Noise Level Exposure recommendations. Interventions addressed the excessive decibels of pill crushers, squeaky/banging doors and loud talking. Signage was used to educate staff to speak softly. Data Analysis: A comparative table was constructed detailing the data results and the equivalent environmental noise source. Changes in pre- and post-intervention decibels were charted. Findings: Noise levels were reduced in the areas where interventions were implemented. After the installation of silencers, the noise from the banging kitchen door was reduced from 70.4 decibels to 61.9. Pill crusher levels were reduced from 86.5 to less than 30 decibels. Banging patient door noise ranged from 95.4 to 101.9 at the pre test and was reduced to a mean of 63 decibels. Although verbal noise was not specifically identifiable, signage and the noise meter increased the awareness of noise pollution by the staff. Discussion: Further noise tests and interventions will be implemented. The study illustrated the feasibility of conducting noise level measurements and taking steps to decrease noise levels.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:54Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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