Self Efficacy and Teaching About Postpartum Depression in Hospital Based Perinatal Nurses from and Academic Health Sciences Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183156
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self Efficacy and Teaching About Postpartum Depression in Hospital Based Perinatal Nurses from and Academic Health Sciences Center
Author(s):
Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Eckert, D.; Tomasulo, R.; Myers, J.
Author Details:
M. Cynthia Logsdon, University of Louisville Medical Center, Louisville, KY, email: mclogs01@louisville.edu; D. Eckert; R. Tomasulo; J. Myers
Abstract:
Problem: About 13% of new mothers experience postpartum depression (PPD) in the first year after childbirth. However, few women recognize that they are experiencing PPD, and they seldom discuss their feelings with their health care provider. Hospital based perinatal nurses have a unique opportunity to provide a remedy: to educate new mothers about PPD so that the mothers will later recognize PPD symptoms and seek treatment. Although evidence based practice guidelines from professional organizations encourage hospital based perinatal nurses to educate women about PPD, many nurses feel unprepared and lack confidence for PPD patient education. Purpose: To explore the relationship between self efficacy and postpartum depression (PPD) teaching behaviors of hospital based perinatal nurses employed in an academic health sciences center. The study will replicate an earlier study by the first and fourth authors that focused on PPD teaching behaviors in perinatal nurses employed in a community hospital. Individual differences will be explored between nurses employed at each site and how these differences impact PPD teaching behaviors. Conceptual Framework: The study will be guided by Self Efficacy Theory. Nursing interventions are influenced by one's self efficacy (belief in one's capability to produce a given attainment) for particular practice behaviors. Method: The design of the study is cross sectional and descriptive. Procedure: After IRB and hospital approval, questionnaire packets will be placed in the mail boxes of labor and delivery and mother baby registered nurses inviting them to participate in a research study. A preamble cover letter of invitation will be used rather than informed consent so that no identifying information will be collected. Questionnaire packets will be returned to a sealed box on each unit, and retrieved by the research staff. Sample: The sample will consist of labor and delivery (n=43) and mother baby (n=33) registered nurses employed by an academic health sciences center in a southern area of the United States. Instruments: Instruments will include a research- team- developed measure of self efficacy related to PPD teaching, Rosenberg's Self Esteem instrument, Attitude Toward Seeking Psychological Help Scale, Stigma Scale for Receiving Psychological Help, and demographic questions. Findings: Based upon our previous results, we expect that teaching new mothers about PPD will be related to a hospital based perinatal nurse's self efficacy related to PPD teaching , expectations for teaching from their supervisor, self esteem , PPD continuing education, and experience with observing other nurses teach patients about PPD. Exploratory analysis will focus on differences in nurses employed in academic health sciences centers and community hospitals, and how these differences impact self efficacy related to PPD teaching behaviors. Discussion : It is important to identify variables related to PPD teaching behaviors so that self efficacy related to PPD teaching can be fostered in individual hospital based perinatal nurses, and continuing education can be tailored to those identified as less likely to perform patient teaching. Hospital based perinatal nurses have a unique and important role in teaching new mothers about PPD and following evidence based practice guidelines from professional organizations.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf Efficacy and Teaching About Postpartum Depression in Hospital Based Perinatal Nurses from and Academic Health Sciences Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLogsdon, M. Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEckert, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTomasulo, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Cynthia Logsdon, University of Louisville Medical Center, Louisville, KY, email: mclogs01@louisville.edu; D. Eckert; R. Tomasulo; J. Myersen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183156-
dc.description.abstractProblem: About 13% of new mothers experience postpartum depression (PPD) in the first year after childbirth. However, few women recognize that they are experiencing PPD, and they seldom discuss their feelings with their health care provider. Hospital based perinatal nurses have a unique opportunity to provide a remedy: to educate new mothers about PPD so that the mothers will later recognize PPD symptoms and seek treatment. Although evidence based practice guidelines from professional organizations encourage hospital based perinatal nurses to educate women about PPD, many nurses feel unprepared and lack confidence for PPD patient education. Purpose: To explore the relationship between self efficacy and postpartum depression (PPD) teaching behaviors of hospital based perinatal nurses employed in an academic health sciences center. The study will replicate an earlier study by the first and fourth authors that focused on PPD teaching behaviors in perinatal nurses employed in a community hospital. Individual differences will be explored between nurses employed at each site and how these differences impact PPD teaching behaviors. Conceptual Framework: The study will be guided by Self Efficacy Theory. Nursing interventions are influenced by one's self efficacy (belief in one's capability to produce a given attainment) for particular practice behaviors. Method: The design of the study is cross sectional and descriptive. Procedure: After IRB and hospital approval, questionnaire packets will be placed in the mail boxes of labor and delivery and mother baby registered nurses inviting them to participate in a research study. A preamble cover letter of invitation will be used rather than informed consent so that no identifying information will be collected. Questionnaire packets will be returned to a sealed box on each unit, and retrieved by the research staff. Sample: The sample will consist of labor and delivery (n=43) and mother baby (n=33) registered nurses employed by an academic health sciences center in a southern area of the United States. Instruments: Instruments will include a research- team- developed measure of self efficacy related to PPD teaching, Rosenberg's Self Esteem instrument, Attitude Toward Seeking Psychological Help Scale, Stigma Scale for Receiving Psychological Help, and demographic questions. Findings: Based upon our previous results, we expect that teaching new mothers about PPD will be related to a hospital based perinatal nurse's self efficacy related to PPD teaching , expectations for teaching from their supervisor, self esteem , PPD continuing education, and experience with observing other nurses teach patients about PPD. Exploratory analysis will focus on differences in nurses employed in academic health sciences centers and community hospitals, and how these differences impact self efficacy related to PPD teaching behaviors. Discussion : It is important to identify variables related to PPD teaching behaviors so that self efficacy related to PPD teaching can be fostered in individual hospital based perinatal nurses, and continuing education can be tailored to those identified as less likely to perform patient teaching. Hospital based perinatal nurses have a unique and important role in teaching new mothers about PPD and following evidence based practice guidelines from professional organizations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:16:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:16:56Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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