2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183165
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bugs Be Gone: Reducing Catheter Associated Blood Stream Infections
Author(s):
Ortega, Elena; Gonzalez, I.
Author Details:
Elena Ortega, MSN, ARNP, CCRN, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, email: elena.ortega@mch.com; I. Gonzalez
Abstract:
Purpose: Catheter associated blood stream infections (CA-BSI) have recently become a topic of interest amongst pediatric intensive care units. According to the National Healthcare Safety Network (2008), there are 250,000 CA-BSI in the United States each year. Out of those, 80,000 are in the pediatric intensive care units. Each CA-BSI is associated with an increase in mortality rate by 12 to 25% and costs approximately $25,000 to treat. At our institution, a task force was created to evaluate our current practice regarding central line insertion and care. The task force was a multidisciplinary team which included physicians, the administrator director of critical care, nursing directors, clinical specialists, nurses from the IV team and the Infection Control and Prevention Department. Method: The main goal was to reduce the CA-BSI rates across the three intensive care units. Current clinical practices regarding central line maintenance and a comprehensive literature review was conducted. The team revised four central line policies, instituted a hospital wide hands-on training and created four observational checklists for the staff to use as guidance, consistent with new evidence based practices. The four observational checklists consisted of central line insertion, central line dressing changes, tubing changes and mediport access. As part of our practice change we implemented (a) the use of chlorhexidine as the primary skin antiseptic during the insertion process, (b) dressing changes, and (c) daily line maintenance care. In addition, we instituted the use of alcohol rinse as part of the hand hygiene prior to insertion and when handling the central line. Findings: As a result of this practice change, a comprehensive educational program was developed and disseminated across all staff members that included nurses, physicians, and advanced nurse practitioners. Subsequently, there has been continuous reinforcement of the clinical practice changes through the use of observational checklists.
Implementation of the new practice changes, use of observational checklists, and education of staff has resulted in a significant reduction in the CA-BSI rate in all three pediatric intensive care units. Discussion: The work of this team has demonstrated the strength of interdisciplinary collaboration in successfully negotiating a practice change. It also clearly evident that this is an on-going project which warrants further research in order to identify new best practices regarding care of central lines. Implications for practice based on the current findings show that standardization of central line maintenance throughout the three intensive care units is essential to reduce the rate of CA-BSI.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBugs Be Gone: Reducing Catheter Associated Blood Stream Infectionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOrtega, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, I.en_US
dc.author.detailsElena Ortega, MSN, ARNP, CCRN, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, email: elena.ortega@mch.com; I. Gonzalezen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183165-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Catheter associated blood stream infections (CA-BSI) have recently become a topic of interest amongst pediatric intensive care units. According to the National Healthcare Safety Network (2008), there are 250,000 CA-BSI in the United States each year. Out of those, 80,000 are in the pediatric intensive care units. Each CA-BSI is associated with an increase in mortality rate by 12 to 25% and costs approximately $25,000 to treat. At our institution, a task force was created to evaluate our current practice regarding central line insertion and care. The task force was a multidisciplinary team which included physicians, the administrator director of critical care, nursing directors, clinical specialists, nurses from the IV team and the Infection Control and Prevention Department. Method: The main goal was to reduce the CA-BSI rates across the three intensive care units. Current clinical practices regarding central line maintenance and a comprehensive literature review was conducted. The team revised four central line policies, instituted a hospital wide hands-on training and created four observational checklists for the staff to use as guidance, consistent with new evidence based practices. The four observational checklists consisted of central line insertion, central line dressing changes, tubing changes and mediport access. As part of our practice change we implemented (a) the use of chlorhexidine as the primary skin antiseptic during the insertion process, (b) dressing changes, and (c) daily line maintenance care. In addition, we instituted the use of alcohol rinse as part of the hand hygiene prior to insertion and when handling the central line. Findings: As a result of this practice change, a comprehensive educational program was developed and disseminated across all staff members that included nurses, physicians, and advanced nurse practitioners. Subsequently, there has been continuous reinforcement of the clinical practice changes through the use of observational checklists.<br/>Implementation of the new practice changes, use of observational checklists, and education of staff has resulted in a significant reduction in the CA-BSI rate in all three pediatric intensive care units. Discussion: The work of this team has demonstrated the strength of interdisciplinary collaboration in successfully negotiating a practice change. It also clearly evident that this is an on-going project which warrants further research in order to identify new best practices regarding care of central lines. Implications for practice based on the current findings show that standardization of central line maintenance throughout the three intensive care units is essential to reduce the rate of CA-BSI.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:17:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:17:20Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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