2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183167
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Nurses' Stress and Nurse Staffing Patterns in a Hospital Setting
Author(s):
Purcell, Stacey; Cobb, S.; Kutash, M.
Author Details:
Stacey Purcell, RN, MSN, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, FL, email: sboutili@health.usf.edu; S. Cobb, M. Kutash
Abstract:
Purpose: Research is lacking relating well-documented job-related stressors among nurses, to specific staffing patterns and age. The primary objective is to examine the relationships of both the perceived stress scale (PSS) scores and the nursing stress scale (NSS) scores with staffing patterns and age. Methods: The sample consisted of RNs working at a teaching hospital located in the southeast United States. An internet survey (Survey Monkey) was used to collect data. Completion of the survey indicated informed consent. Variables included demographic information, work setting information, NSS and PSS. The NSS and PSS are summated scales with higher scores indicating higher levels of stress. A median split on age was used to define nurses as under the age of 37 or not. A variable for weekend was created, defined as working more days on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday versus working more days on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday. Findings: There were 321 surveys completed. Missing data points left 197 surveys with complete data. The original respondents (N = 321) were female (93%), with an average age of 39 years, average of 11 years of nursing experience, and the average of 38 hours worked weekly. The majority of nurses were married, 50% had no children living with them, and 8% lived with parents. The most frequent educational level was a Bachelor's degree. The majority (53.3%) worked day shifts, most frequently on Monday and Tuesday. There were no differences between the completers and the non-completers on age (Chi = 39.054, p = .683), experience (Chi = 61.128, p = .097), and total hours worked weekly (Chi = 9.795, p = .134). Among the completers, a positive correlation (r = .363, p < .05) was found between the summated NSS and PSS as well as between age and highest number of patients assigned during their last shift (r = .218, p < .05). A significant negative correlation (r = -.142, p < .05) existed between NSS and age. No significant correlations were noted between PSS and the average weekly worked hours. Analysis of variance showed that younger nurses had significantly more nursing stress than did the older nurses (F = 4.283 (1,195), p < .05) Moreover, the younger nurses who worked mostly weekends had significantly more nursing stress than did the younger nurses who did not work mostly weekends (F = 11.751 (1,71), p < .05). Variability in PSS and NSS scores were significantly affected by age of nurse and working the weekend. Discussion: A key limitation of this study was the number of respondents with complete data on the stress scales; thus the analysis was underpowered. The results indicate that age and the day of the week worked are important factors affecting nurses' stress levels. This study serves as another piece of the nurse/stress relationship within acute care. Further research is needed to understand the intricacies of various stresses that nurses encounter today and their potential clinical consequences.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Nurses' Stress and Nurse Staffing Patterns in a Hospital Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPurcell, Staceyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCobb, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKutash, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsStacey Purcell, RN, MSN, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, FL, email: sboutili@health.usf.edu; S. Cobb, M. Kutashen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183167-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Research is lacking relating well-documented job-related stressors among nurses, to specific staffing patterns and age. The primary objective is to examine the relationships of both the perceived stress scale (PSS) scores and the nursing stress scale (NSS) scores with staffing patterns and age. Methods: The sample consisted of RNs working at a teaching hospital located in the southeast United States. An internet survey (Survey Monkey) was used to collect data. Completion of the survey indicated informed consent. Variables included demographic information, work setting information, NSS and PSS. The NSS and PSS are summated scales with higher scores indicating higher levels of stress. A median split on age was used to define nurses as under the age of 37 or not. A variable for weekend was created, defined as working more days on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday versus working more days on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday. Findings: There were 321 surveys completed. Missing data points left 197 surveys with complete data. The original respondents (N = 321) were female (93%), with an average age of 39 years, average of 11 years of nursing experience, and the average of 38 hours worked weekly. The majority of nurses were married, 50% had no children living with them, and 8% lived with parents. The most frequent educational level was a Bachelor's degree. The majority (53.3%) worked day shifts, most frequently on Monday and Tuesday. There were no differences between the completers and the non-completers on age (Chi = 39.054, p = .683), experience (Chi = 61.128, p = .097), and total hours worked weekly (Chi = 9.795, p = .134). Among the completers, a positive correlation (r = .363, p &lt; .05) was found between the summated NSS and PSS as well as between age and highest number of patients assigned during their last shift (r = .218, p &lt; .05). A significant negative correlation (r = -.142, p &lt; .05) existed between NSS and age. No significant correlations were noted between PSS and the average weekly worked hours. Analysis of variance showed that younger nurses had significantly more nursing stress than did the older nurses (F = 4.283 (1,195), p &lt; .05) Moreover, the younger nurses who worked mostly weekends had significantly more nursing stress than did the younger nurses who did not work mostly weekends (F = 11.751 (1,71), p &lt; .05). Variability in PSS and NSS scores were significantly affected by age of nurse and working the weekend. Discussion: A key limitation of this study was the number of respondents with complete data on the stress scales; thus the analysis was underpowered. The results indicate that age and the day of the week worked are important factors affecting nurses' stress levels. This study serves as another piece of the nurse/stress relationship within acute care. Further research is needed to understand the intricacies of various stresses that nurses encounter today and their potential clinical consequences.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:17:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:17:25Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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