Patient Perceptions of Personal Spirituality, Nursing Care, and Spiritual Care in the Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183170
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Perceptions of Personal Spirituality, Nursing Care, and Spiritual Care in the Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Population
Author(s):
Reade, Marina; Webb-Strome, D.; Gibson, D.; Story, C.; Lyon, J.; Lichvar, P.; Knight, G.; Wilkes, L.; Serrato, L.; Lish, S.; Hester, V.; Short, V.; Shepard, K.; Kendrick, S.; Opie, S.
Author Details:
Marina Reade, RN, MSN, CNS-BC, OCN at the Banner Blood and Marrow Transplant Center, Phoenix, AZ, email: Marina.Reade@bannerhealth.com; D. Webb-Strome; D. Gibson; C. Story; J. Lyon; P. Lichvar; G. Knight; L. Wilkes; L. Serrato; S. Lish; V. Hester; V. Short; K. Shepard; S. Kendrick; S. Opie
Abstract:
Purpose: Evidence suggests there is a failure to address spiritual concerns in patients undergoing cancer therapy, and only 10% of all patients are ultimately identified and referred for assistance. Since Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (PBSCT) is reserved typically for patients who face life threatening illnesses, it seems they may represent a population facing an even higher level of spiritual distress than the 40% described in the general oncology population. PBSCT patients may represent a group that is especially suited for identification and treatment regarding spiritual needs, given the high morbidity and mortality, long hospital stays, and frequent outpatient visits post transplantation. In conjunction with our hospital spiritual care department, we hypothesized that PBSCT patients experience higher levels of spiritual distress; therefore a comprehensive IRB approved research study was designed to evaluate this possibility. Methods: Attitudes about spirituality and perceived need for spiritual assistance were evaluated in 44 patients before PBSCT and again approximately 30 days after hospital discharge. Survey tools included the 10 question Spirituality Perspective Scale (SPS) and a 7 question Patient Questionnaire (PQ) on perceived spiritual assistance. Statistical analysis by unpaired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-PBSCT findings using published methods. The p-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Findings: Of the 44 consecutive patients approached, 32 consented to participate. At the time of writing, 23 pairs of pre and post transplant surveys were available for analysis. As measured by the SPS, overall patient spirituality increased from 4.2 +/- 1.4 to 4.9 +/- 0.4 (p=0.02). Responses to questions regarding prayer/meditation, forgiveness, a higher power, and influence and importance to life demonstrated significant increases. However, the average response for the other questions remained unchanged. Results from the PQ indicated that although 80% of patients desired spiritual care and were comfortable discussing this with their nurses, less than 33% reported discussion with nurses at any time during the transplant process. Surprisingly, the majority of patients perceived no contact with the hospital spiritual care department during treatment or follow-up (75% pre-PBSCT, 50% post-PBSCT). Post PBSCT surveys indicated that 66% of patients who wanted spiritual assistance preferred it before discharge from the hospital vs. 16% after discharge. Discussion: Results from the PBSCT patient population are consistent with previously published observations that cancer treatment leads to an increase in spirituality. This increase appears to be attributed to the inner personal dimension rather than external social aspects. Every PBSCT patient receives an initial visit from spiritual care and more visits if requested, so it is unclear why the patient perception about assistance is remarkably low. Although spiritual care is not considered a traditional medical discipline, results from this portion of the study suggest that it is an integral component of the PBSCT process for many patients. As part of a larger study to yield additional insight into these trends, further research is underway to include analyzing nurses' perceptions of spirituality and the effect of spiritual assessment training for nurses on patient spiritual care perception.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Perceptions of Personal Spirituality, Nursing Care, and Spiritual Care in the Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReade, Marinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebb-Strome, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGibson, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStory, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLyon, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLichvar, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnight, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkes, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSerrato, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLish, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHester, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShort, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepard, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKendrick, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOpie, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsMarina Reade, RN, MSN, CNS-BC, OCN at the Banner Blood and Marrow Transplant Center, Phoenix, AZ, email: Marina.Reade@bannerhealth.com; D. Webb-Strome; D. Gibson; C. Story; J. Lyon; P. Lichvar; G. Knight; L. Wilkes; L. Serrato; S. Lish; V. Hester; V. Short; K. Shepard; S. Kendrick; S. Opieen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183170-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Evidence suggests there is a failure to address spiritual concerns in patients undergoing cancer therapy, and only 10% of all patients are ultimately identified and referred for assistance. Since Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (PBSCT) is reserved typically for patients who face life threatening illnesses, it seems they may represent a population facing an even higher level of spiritual distress than the 40% described in the general oncology population. PBSCT patients may represent a group that is especially suited for identification and treatment regarding spiritual needs, given the high morbidity and mortality, long hospital stays, and frequent outpatient visits post transplantation. In conjunction with our hospital spiritual care department, we hypothesized that PBSCT patients experience higher levels of spiritual distress; therefore a comprehensive IRB approved research study was designed to evaluate this possibility. Methods: Attitudes about spirituality and perceived need for spiritual assistance were evaluated in 44 patients before PBSCT and again approximately 30 days after hospital discharge. Survey tools included the 10 question Spirituality Perspective Scale (SPS) and a 7 question Patient Questionnaire (PQ) on perceived spiritual assistance. Statistical analysis by unpaired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-PBSCT findings using published methods. The p-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Findings: Of the 44 consecutive patients approached, 32 consented to participate. At the time of writing, 23 pairs of pre and post transplant surveys were available for analysis. As measured by the SPS, overall patient spirituality increased from 4.2 +/- 1.4 to 4.9 +/- 0.4 (p=0.02). Responses to questions regarding prayer/meditation, forgiveness, a higher power, and influence and importance to life demonstrated significant increases. However, the average response for the other questions remained unchanged. Results from the PQ indicated that although 80% of patients desired spiritual care and were comfortable discussing this with their nurses, less than 33% reported discussion with nurses at any time during the transplant process. Surprisingly, the majority of patients perceived no contact with the hospital spiritual care department during treatment or follow-up (75% pre-PBSCT, 50% post-PBSCT). Post PBSCT surveys indicated that 66% of patients who wanted spiritual assistance preferred it before discharge from the hospital vs. 16% after discharge. Discussion: Results from the PBSCT patient population are consistent with previously published observations that cancer treatment leads to an increase in spirituality. This increase appears to be attributed to the inner personal dimension rather than external social aspects. Every PBSCT patient receives an initial visit from spiritual care and more visits if requested, so it is unclear why the patient perception about assistance is remarkably low. Although spiritual care is not considered a traditional medical discipline, results from this portion of the study suggest that it is an integral component of the PBSCT process for many patients. As part of a larger study to yield additional insight into these trends, further research is underway to include analyzing nurses' perceptions of spirituality and the effect of spiritual assessment training for nurses on patient spiritual care perception.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:17:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:17:33Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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