2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198298
Title:
Supporting Nursing Research Through an Internship Program
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Supporting Nursing Research Through An Internship Program
Purpose: Staff nurses perceive numerous barriers to becoming actively involved in individual research projects at the bedside. Among the barriers identified are a lack of knowledge, practical experience, time, and organizational support. The objective of this project is to encourage, support, and mentor staff nurses through the research process.

Design: The use of a model for evidence-based practice guided this staff development project. After identification of the need to promote nursing research at the bedside, a team conducted a thorough literature review which revealed internship programs can positively influence staff nurses’ attitudes toward nursing research and evidence-based practice, address barriers, and bring together resources and tools needed to conduct nursing research. Upon completion of the literature review and investigation of similar programs, the team drafted a proposal describing the program, its goals, anticipated benefits, program design, application, and evaluation.
A faculty member from a local nursing graduate program joined the team as an advisor.

Setting: A private, not-for-profit, multi-hospital system located in a southeastern metropolitan region. The system offers emergency services at five locations: a Level II Trauma center, a freestanding emergency department, two hospital-based emergency departments, and an urgent care center. This five-hospital system was first awarded the Magnet Recognition for Nursing Excellence in 2005 and redesignated in 2009.

Participants/Subjects: Participants represent four hospitals and represent a range of experience. Requirements to be accepted into the program include a minimum of one year experience, at least half time employment, baccalaureate in nursing, willingness to commit to a research project until completed, and a letter of support from unit leadership.

Method: Early in 2010, the team selected candidates based on a blinded application process using a standardized evaluation tool. Six nurses received offers to participate in the program. In the spring 2010, the interns began the program by attending the annual system-sponsored Nursing Research Symposium and an 8-hour program orientation. Interns paired into teams and started meeting monthly with the advising team and the faculty advisor. The focus of each monthly session is a step in the research process. Reading assignments, mentoring, and problem solving between sessions help keep the interns on track.

Results: Three research projects are in progress. Two teams have presented their abstracts and IRB applications and have received approval. The third team lost a member and the remaining intern is completing the abstract and IRB application. Department leadership supports the interns by allowing for time to attend classes and to participate in the program.

Implications: Organizational, structural, and personal supports have been instrumental to promoting nursing research at the bedside. All participants in this program have garnered research skills and tools. In addition, these interns have drawn other nurses into their projects, creating increased interest in nursing research and evidence-based practice. What appeared to be overwhelming at the beginning of the program has been broken down into doable and understandable steps one month at a time.

Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleSupporting Nursing Research Through an Internship Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198298-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Supporting Nursing Research Through An Internship Program <br/>Purpose: Staff nurses perceive numerous barriers to becoming actively involved in individual research projects at the bedside. Among the barriers identified are a lack of knowledge, practical experience, time, and organizational support. The objective of this project is to encourage, support, and mentor staff nurses through the research process.<br/><br/>Design: The use of a model for evidence-based practice guided this staff development project. After identification of the need to promote nursing research at the bedside, a team conducted a thorough literature review which revealed internship programs can positively influence staff nurses’ attitudes toward nursing research and evidence-based practice, address barriers, and bring together resources and tools needed to conduct nursing research. Upon completion of the literature review and investigation of similar programs, the team drafted a proposal describing the program, its goals, anticipated benefits, program design, application, and evaluation.<br/>A faculty member from a local nursing graduate program joined the team as an advisor.<br/><br/>Setting: A private, not-for-profit, multi-hospital system located in a southeastern metropolitan region. The system offers emergency services at five locations: a Level II Trauma center, a freestanding emergency department, two hospital-based emergency departments, and an urgent care center. This five-hospital system was first awarded the Magnet Recognition for Nursing Excellence in 2005 and redesignated in 2009.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: Participants represent four hospitals and represent a range of experience. Requirements to be accepted into the program include a minimum of one year experience, at least half time employment, baccalaureate in nursing, willingness to commit to a research project until completed, and a letter of support from unit leadership.<br/> <br/>Method: Early in 2010, the team selected candidates based on a blinded application process using a standardized evaluation tool. Six nurses received offers to participate in the program. In the spring 2010, the interns began the program by attending the annual system-sponsored Nursing Research Symposium and an 8-hour program orientation. Interns paired into teams and started meeting monthly with the advising team and the faculty advisor. The focus of each monthly session is a step in the research process. Reading assignments, mentoring, and problem solving between sessions help keep the interns on track. <br/><br/>Results: Three research projects are in progress. Two teams have presented their abstracts and IRB applications and have received approval. The third team lost a member and the remaining intern is completing the abstract and IRB application. Department leadership supports the interns by allowing for time to attend classes and to participate in the program. <br/><br/>Implications: Organizational, structural, and personal supports have been instrumental to promoting nursing research at the bedside. All participants in this program have garnered research skills and tools. In addition, these interns have drawn other nurses into their projects, creating increased interest in nursing research and evidence-based practice. What appeared to be overwhelming at the beginning of the program has been broken down into doable and understandable steps one month at a time. <br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:45:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:45:15Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:45:15Z-
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