Service Excellence: Care that Continues After Emergency DepartmentTreatment and Discharge

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198305
Title:
Service Excellence: Care that Continues After Emergency DepartmentTreatment and Discharge
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Service Excellence: Care that Continues After Emergency Department Treatment and Discharge

Purpose: While calling people back after a service related encounter to gauge satisfaction is not a novel idea, applying this strategy in an ED setting is. The purpose of this initiative was: to evaluate the benefit to overall patient satisfaction scores by calling discharged patient to provide answers to any lingering questions about discharge instructions; to evaluate the effectiveness of their discharge plan; and to have more real time information about how patients felt about the care that they had recently received; and if they were satisfied with the medical services and basic customer service provided to them during their visit.

Design: Using a scripted questionnaire, emergency medicine physicians and nurses telephonically called patients within 48 hours discharge.

Setting: Urban Level I Emergency Department with over 70,000 annual visits

Participants/Subjects: Emergency medicine physicians, nurses, patients

Methods: A standardized training manual was created to prepare clinicians to make the calls using a script that includes caller identification, reason for call, inquiry into current health status, questions about discharge instructions or follow-up care, degree of care demonstrated by the clinicians during visit, what could have been done differently for them to feel better cared for, was information about any delays in care provided if applicable, and if the patient would like to recognize any staff members who cared for them. The patient is informed that they may receive a Patient Satisfaction survey in the mail regarding the care they received, stressing how important it is for them to share their feedback. Issues that are identified during the call that are determined to immediately affect that patient’s current health status are referred to an physician who is working currently in the ED for additional follow-up. The call itself is documented in a dedicated section of the patient’s electronic medical record and the number of calls at any given time can be queried from the data repository. Those numbers are then analyzed in relation to Press Ganey? Patient Satisfaction Scores from that same time period.

Results/Outcomes: At present 10% of the nurse FTEs (n=10) participate in completing the patient calls along with Emergency Medicine Residents and Attending Physicians. In 2010 January, 415 calls were made (0.6% of annual visits) with over 800 calls in 2010 December (1% of annual visits). Press Ganey? scores improved in months where greater numbers of calls were made. While multiple initiatives were ongoing to impact patient satisfaction in 2010, several initiatives actually diminished in consistency. The only initiative that was consistent was calling patients after discharge. Overall patient satisfaction in 2010 January was 84.7, increasing to 87.4 in 2010 December.

Implications: Sustaining a program of calling people back after an emergency department visit is possible through focused training, scripting, and using the electronic medical record to document and manage data. Even a small percentage of calls can positively impact patient satisfaction scores.

Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleService Excellence: Care that Continues After Emergency DepartmentTreatment and Dischargeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198305-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Service Excellence: Care that Continues After Emergency Department Treatment and Discharge<br/><br/>Purpose: While calling people back after a service related encounter to gauge satisfaction is not a novel idea, applying this strategy in an ED setting is. The purpose of this initiative was: to evaluate the benefit to overall patient satisfaction scores by calling discharged patient to provide answers to any lingering questions about discharge instructions; to evaluate the effectiveness of their discharge plan; and to have more real time information about how patients felt about the care that they had recently received; and if they were satisfied with the medical services and basic customer service provided to them during their visit. <br/><br/>Design: Using a scripted questionnaire, emergency medicine physicians and nurses telephonically called patients within 48 hours discharge. <br/><br/>Setting: Urban Level I Emergency Department with over 70,000 annual visits<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: Emergency medicine physicians, nurses, patients <br/><br/>Methods: A standardized training manual was created to prepare clinicians to make the calls using a script that includes caller identification, reason for call, inquiry into current health status, questions about discharge instructions or follow-up care, degree of care demonstrated by the clinicians during visit, what could have been done differently for them to feel better cared for, was information about any delays in care provided if applicable, and if the patient would like to recognize any staff members who cared for them. The patient is informed that they may receive a Patient Satisfaction survey in the mail regarding the care they received, stressing how important it is for them to share their feedback. Issues that are identified during the call that are determined to immediately affect that patient’s current health status are referred to an physician who is working currently in the ED for additional follow-up. The call itself is documented in a dedicated section of the patient’s electronic medical record and the number of calls at any given time can be queried from the data repository. Those numbers are then analyzed in relation to Press Ganey? Patient Satisfaction Scores from that same time period. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: At present 10% of the nurse FTEs (n=10) participate in completing the patient calls along with Emergency Medicine Residents and Attending Physicians. In 2010 January, 415 calls were made (0.6% of annual visits) with over 800 calls in 2010 December (1% of annual visits). Press Ganey? scores improved in months where greater numbers of calls were made. While multiple initiatives were ongoing to impact patient satisfaction in 2010, several initiatives actually diminished in consistency. The only initiative that was consistent was calling patients after discharge. Overall patient satisfaction in 2010 January was 84.7, increasing to 87.4 in 2010 December. <br/><br/>Implications: Sustaining a program of calling people back after an emergency department visit is possible through focused training, scripting, and using the electronic medical record to document and manage data. Even a small percentage of calls can positively impact patient satisfaction scores. <br/> <br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:45:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:45:37Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:45:37Z-
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