Leadership Style, Horizontal Violence, and Emergency Department Staff Nurse Retention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198330
Title:
Leadership Style, Horizontal Violence, and Emergency Department Staff Nurse Retention
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation]Leadership Style, Horizontal Violence, and Emergency Department Staff Nurse Retention

Purpose: Recruitment and retention of registered nurses are among the greatest challenges facing nursing in healthcare organizations today. The factors influencing recruitment and retention of nurses include leadership style, horizontal violence, job satisfaction, organizational culture, job stress, group cohesion, age of the nurse, and access to professional education. Bally (2007) reports a staggering number of registered nurses leaving professional nursing practice due to feelings of stress, inadequacy, anxiety, oppression, and disempowerment which are often a result of horizontal violence.

Design: This quantitative study was a cross-sectional national survey that examined leadership style of the nurse manager, horizontal violence, and anticipated turnover of staff nurses in the Emergency Department (ED). The dependent variable was anticipated staff nurse turnover and the independent variables were the leadership style of the nurse manager and horizontal violence. An Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) Foundation/Stryker Industry-Supported Research Grant was received to fund this project.

Setting: A letter of invitation to participate in the on-line survey was mailed to a sample of nurses generated by the ENA from their membership. The sample list included nurses from 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Participants/Subjects: The study was approved by all associated institutional review boards and committees. Two hundred and one respondents completed the survey through SurveyMonkey. One hundred and forty-seven were RN staff nurses currently working in an ED. The majority of respondents were female (n=166, 82.6%). The age range was 20-61 years, with 44.3% having worked in an ED between one and 10 years.

Methods: An on-line, self-administered questionnaire comprised of demographic questions, the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ-5X) (Avolio and Bass, 2004), the Sabotage Savvy Survey (Briles, 2003), and the Anticipated Turnover Scale (Hinshaw and Atwood, 1985) were used to collect data. Permission to use the three instruments was obtained from the appropriate sources. Psychometric properties of the instruments were reviewed.

Results/Outcomes: Eighty-six (47.5%) respondents rated their nurse managers above the mean score on the transformational leadership attributes. Approximately 52 (66%) of respondents reported being a victim of horizontal violence on the three most selected examples of violent behaviors and 57 (84%) reported knowledge of horizontal violence on examples of behaviors. Although there is no established cut-off score for anticipated turnover, lower total scores are indicative of an increased likelihood of turnover. The range of scores was 23-84 (M=54.54, SD=15.807). A moderately strong correlation was found between the transformational leadership style and anticipated turnover (r=.555, p=<.01), indicating the higher transformational leadership style scores, the less the anticipated turnover.

Implications: The results of this study will be used to educate nurse managers and leaders on the impact of their leadership style as well as the influence of their leadership style on anticipated turnover in the ED setting and on strategies to decrease the presence of horizontal violence.



Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleLeadership Style, Horizontal Violence, and Emergency Department Staff Nurse Retentionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198330-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation]Leadership Style, Horizontal Violence, and Emergency Department Staff Nurse Retention<br/><br/>Purpose: Recruitment and retention of registered nurses are among the greatest challenges facing nursing in healthcare organizations today. The factors influencing recruitment and retention of nurses include leadership style, horizontal violence, job satisfaction, organizational culture, job stress, group cohesion, age of the nurse, and access to professional education. Bally (2007) reports a staggering number of registered nurses leaving professional nursing practice due to feelings of stress, inadequacy, anxiety, oppression, and disempowerment which are often a result of horizontal violence.<br/><br/>Design: This quantitative study was a cross-sectional national survey that examined leadership style of the nurse manager, horizontal violence, and anticipated turnover of staff nurses in the Emergency Department (ED). The dependent variable was anticipated staff nurse turnover and the independent variables were the leadership style of the nurse manager and horizontal violence. An Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) Foundation/Stryker Industry-Supported Research Grant was received to fund this project. <br/><br/>Setting: A letter of invitation to participate in the on-line survey was mailed to a sample of nurses generated by the ENA from their membership. The sample list included nurses from 50 states and the District of Columbia.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: The study was approved by all associated institutional review boards and committees. Two hundred and one respondents completed the survey through SurveyMonkey. One hundred and forty-seven were RN staff nurses currently working in an ED. The majority of respondents were female (n=166, 82.6%). The age range was 20-61 years, with 44.3% having worked in an ED between one and 10 years.<br/><br/>Methods: An on-line, self-administered questionnaire comprised of demographic questions, the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ-5X) (Avolio and Bass, 2004), the Sabotage Savvy Survey (Briles, 2003), and the Anticipated Turnover Scale (Hinshaw and Atwood, 1985) were used to collect data. Permission to use the three instruments was obtained from the appropriate sources. Psychometric properties of the instruments were reviewed.<br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Eighty-six (47.5%) respondents rated their nurse managers above the mean score on the transformational leadership attributes. Approximately 52 (66%) of respondents reported being a victim of horizontal violence on the three most selected examples of violent behaviors and 57 (84%) reported knowledge of horizontal violence on examples of behaviors. Although there is no established cut-off score for anticipated turnover, lower total scores are indicative of an increased likelihood of turnover. The range of scores was 23-84 (M=54.54, SD=15.807). A moderately strong correlation was found between the transformational leadership style and anticipated turnover (r=.555, p=<.01), indicating the higher transformational leadership style scores, the less the anticipated turnover.<br/><br/>Implications: The results of this study will be used to educate nurse managers and leaders on the impact of their leadership style as well as the influence of their leadership style on anticipated turnover in the ED setting and on strategies to decrease the presence of horizontal violence. <br/><br/> <br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:45:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:45:52Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:45:52Z-
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