2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198332
Title:
Barcoding in the Emergency Department: Who Said it Couldn't be Done
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Barcoding in the Emergency Department: Who Said it Couldn't be Done

Purpose: Medication barcoding at the point of care has been practiced in an academic, community Magnet health network since 2003. This practice has improved patient safety by decreasing medication errors and currently has a 98% compliance rate. Nursing leadership was challenged to implement this process in the Emergency Department (ED) setting.

Design: This was a quality improvement project to improve patient safety for the delivery of medications in the ED setting.

Setting: The pilot was conducted in the ED Express Care in a 988 bed academic, community Magnet health network with multiple campuses and EDs.

Participants/subjects: A multidisciplinary work group was formed inclusive of nursing leadership, ED staff nurses, Director of Pharmacy, ED Physician Assistant, Director of Emergency Services, and Nursing Informatics staff.

Methods: The multidisciplinary group met every 2-weeks to develop an implementation strategy for medication barcoding in the ED setting. Barriers identified included prescriber compliance with electronic medication orders, staff resistance, equipment needs, and perceived increased length of stay in the ED. The group decided to trial the process in the ED Express Care area for non-emergent medications to assure the process ran smoothly before Network wide implementation. Prior to go-live, Nursing Informatics and Pharmacy colleagues worked together to assure all commonly utilized ED medications had a barcode loaded in the information system and all equipment was available and working. ED prescribers were re-educated on the requirement for orders to be electronically entered prior to administration. The health information system requires an order to be placed by the physician and verified by the pharmacy in order for barcode verification to occur at the point of administration. Education of ED staff prior to go-live and Nursing Informatics support during implementation was key.

Results/Outcomes: Feedback from staff verbally and via the Bar Code Issues Communication Form provided opportunity to tweak the process. Since implementation in March 2010, the ED staff have reported improved patient safety and are nearing 90% compliance. The identified barriers related to timing of prescriber electronic order entry are no longer an issue, as all ED medical staff have embraced medication barcoding. Based on the success of this pilot, medication barcoding at the point of care will be rolled-out to all Network EDs.

Implications: This presentation will focus on the development of a strategic plan for barcoding at the point of care in the ED setting, staff education, and associated outcomes. The successful outcomes experienced by the presenting organization have allowed barcoding at the point of care to expand throughout all network ED settings. Emergency department nurses attending this session will take away pragmatic strategies to implement barcoding at the point of care in any ED setting.


Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleBarcoding in the Emergency Department: Who Said it Couldn't be Doneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198332-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Barcoding in the Emergency Department: Who Said it Couldn't be Done<br/><br/>Purpose: Medication barcoding at the point of care has been practiced in an academic, community Magnet health network since 2003. This practice has improved patient safety by decreasing medication errors and currently has a 98% compliance rate. Nursing leadership was challenged to implement this process in the Emergency Department (ED) setting. <br/><br/>Design: This was a quality improvement project to improve patient safety for the delivery of medications in the ED setting. <br/><br/>Setting: The pilot was conducted in the ED Express Care in a 988 bed academic, community Magnet health network with multiple campuses and EDs. <br/><br/>Participants/subjects: A multidisciplinary work group was formed inclusive of nursing leadership, ED staff nurses, Director of Pharmacy, ED Physician Assistant, Director of Emergency Services, and Nursing Informatics staff. <br/><br/>Methods: The multidisciplinary group met every 2-weeks to develop an implementation strategy for medication barcoding in the ED setting. Barriers identified included prescriber compliance with electronic medication orders, staff resistance, equipment needs, and perceived increased length of stay in the ED. The group decided to trial the process in the ED Express Care area for non-emergent medications to assure the process ran smoothly before Network wide implementation. Prior to go-live, Nursing Informatics and Pharmacy colleagues worked together to assure all commonly utilized ED medications had a barcode loaded in the information system and all equipment was available and working. ED prescribers were re-educated on the requirement for orders to be electronically entered prior to administration. The health information system requires an order to be placed by the physician and verified by the pharmacy in order for barcode verification to occur at the point of administration. Education of ED staff prior to go-live and Nursing Informatics support during implementation was key. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Feedback from staff verbally and via the Bar Code Issues Communication Form provided opportunity to tweak the process. Since implementation in March 2010, the ED staff have reported improved patient safety and are nearing 90% compliance. The identified barriers related to timing of prescriber electronic order entry are no longer an issue, as all ED medical staff have embraced medication barcoding. Based on the success of this pilot, medication barcoding at the point of care will be rolled-out to all Network EDs. <br/><br/>Implications: This presentation will focus on the development of a strategic plan for barcoding at the point of care in the ED setting, staff education, and associated outcomes. The successful outcomes experienced by the presenting organization have allowed barcoding at the point of care to expand throughout all network ED settings. Emergency department nurses attending this session will take away pragmatic strategies to implement barcoding at the point of care in any ED setting.<br/><br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:45:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:45:59Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:45:59Z-
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