Can Support Staff be Trained to Reliably Use Bedside Ultrasound to Measure Bladder Volumes?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198337
Title:
Can Support Staff be Trained to Reliably Use Bedside Ultrasound to Measure Bladder Volumes?
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation]Can support staff be trained to use bedside ultrasound to measure bladder volumes?

Purpose: Support staff in the Emergency Department (ED) traditionally assesses patient bladder volumes using a proprietary bladder scanning machine. However, ED-based portable bedside ultrasound is increasingly available not only to physicians, but also nurses and Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs).
The study sought to evaluate: 1) if nurses and EMTs can be trained to use bedside ultrasound to reliably evaluate voided bladder volumes and 2) how these measurements compared to the standard assessment with a proprietary bladder scanner.

Design: This is a quasi experimental design study. There was no randomization of scanners or volunteers.

Setting: The study took place in in urban level 1 trauma center located in the intermountain western United States.

Participants: Currently licensed 4 RNs and 5 EMTS were chosen to receive training, scan bladders and collect data. The volunteers were other staff members and a mix of male and female ages 21-60. Scanners were instructed to scan 10 different volunteers, but some volunteers were scanned more than once by different volunteers

Method: 9 nurses and EMTs (scanners) were trained in a standardized manner. Each scanner then evaluated the bladder volume of 10 volunteer staff using the bedside ultrasound(GE Satillite) and bladder scanner (BVI 300, Diagnostic Ultrasound). Actual voided volumes were collected,measured and recorded.

Results: The correlation coefficients were r = 0.837 for ultrasound vs. bladderscanner (p<0.001), r = 0.840 for ultrasound vs. voided (p<0.001), and r = 0.925 for bladderscanner vs. voided (p<0.001). Interestingly, it was not found that a statistical trend over time suggesting that with more experience, accuracy between bedside ultrasound measurement and actual voided volumes increased (p=0.36).

Implications: Preliminary data analysis suggests that with training, Emergency Department nurses and EMTs can use ED-based bedside ultrasound to correlate well with actual voided bladder volumes. Bedside ultrasound was shown to be equally as accurate as bladderscanner measurements (+or - 20% of actual volume voided) It will be interesting to follow learning and retention of skill over time.




Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleCan Support Staff be Trained to Reliably Use Bedside Ultrasound to Measure Bladder Volumes?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198337-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation]Can support staff be trained to use bedside ultrasound to measure bladder volumes?<br/><br/>Purpose: Support staff in the Emergency Department (ED) traditionally assesses patient bladder volumes using a proprietary bladder scanning machine. However, ED-based portable bedside ultrasound is increasingly available not only to physicians, but also nurses and Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs). <br/>The study sought to evaluate: 1) if nurses and EMTs can be trained to use bedside ultrasound to reliably evaluate voided bladder volumes and 2) how these measurements compared to the standard assessment with a proprietary bladder scanner. <br/><br/>Design: This is a quasi experimental design study. There was no randomization of scanners or volunteers.<br/><br/>Setting: The study took place in in urban level 1 trauma center located in the intermountain western United States. <br/><br/>Participants: Currently licensed 4 RNs and 5 EMTS were chosen to receive training, scan bladders and collect data. The volunteers were other staff members and a mix of male and female ages 21-60. Scanners were instructed to scan 10 different volunteers, but some volunteers were scanned more than once by different volunteers<br/><br/>Method: 9 nurses and EMTs (scanners) were trained in a standardized manner. Each scanner then evaluated the bladder volume of 10 volunteer staff using the bedside ultrasound(GE Satillite) and bladder scanner (BVI 300, Diagnostic Ultrasound). Actual voided volumes were collected,measured and recorded. <br/><br/>Results: The correlation coefficients were r = 0.837 for ultrasound vs. bladderscanner (p<0.001), r = 0.840 for ultrasound vs. voided (p<0.001), and r = 0.925 for bladderscanner vs. voided (p<0.001). Interestingly, it was not found that a statistical trend over time suggesting that with more experience, accuracy between bedside ultrasound measurement and actual voided volumes increased (p=0.36).<br/><br/>Implications: Preliminary data analysis suggests that with training, Emergency Department nurses and EMTs can use ED-based bedside ultrasound to correlate well with actual voided bladder volumes. Bedside ultrasound was shown to be equally as accurate as bladderscanner measurements (+or - 20% of actual volume voided) It will be interesting to follow learning and retention of skill over time.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:46:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:46:14Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:46:14Z-
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