Free Standing Emergency Medical Centers: Emerging Trends in a New Model of Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198342
Title:
Free Standing Emergency Medical Centers: Emerging Trends in a New Model of Care
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]Free Standing Emergency Medical Centers: Emerging Trends in a New Model of Care

Purpose: The primary purpose is to provide an operational analyses of a new Emergency Services care model; thereby, increasing awareness within the national Emergency Medicine community with the model of Free Standing Emergency Medical Centers (FEMC) and their capabilities.

Background: FEMCs have existed in Texas since 2002. With the passage of Texas House bill 1357 in 2009, FEMCs are now being licensed throughout the state of Texas. With the major challenges facing emergency care delivery throughout the country, FEMCs will compliment traditional hospital-based emergency care delivery.

Design: Quantitative and qualitative data and descriptive analyses of data from business operations of a successful FEMC model in the State of Texas. The data is retrospective from business operations years 2005 to 2010.

Setting: FEMC’s operating in or around major Texas metropolitan cities of Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth and Austin.

Participants: Twelve (12) FEMCs near major Texas metropolitan cities (Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth and Austin). Each facility operates under an individual license while being part of a larger single enterprise.

Methods: Qualitative and quantitative data analyses highlighting operational benchmarks including percentage of inpatient admissions, Top 10 diagnosis, age groups served, lab volumes, patient safety, patient satisfaction results, employee satisfaction results, and overall fiscal performance.

Results/Outcomes: FEMCs can be a valuable adjunct to community hospital based ED’s promoting highly satisfied patients and employees. This model can successfully provide rapid, accurate diagnosis and treatment for patients of all levels of acuity. Impact on Emergency Department overcrowding can be evidenced when transferred patients arrive with completed diagnostics tests, imaging, a working diagnosis and treatment in progress. Diagnostic specimens are collected, completed and reported by the bedside caregiver, so the opportunity for error is diminished and patient safety enhanced.

Implications: FEMCs are an emerging component in the continuum of Emergency Care. This model also provides the Emergency Care consumer with quality options for care provided by experienced Emergency Physicians and Emergency Nurses. As this model becomes more widely understood and accepted amongst the Emergency Community, there is a potential partnership for easing ED overcrowding and surge capacity solutions for community based EDs.


Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleFree Standing Emergency Medical Centers: Emerging Trends in a New Model of Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198342-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]Free Standing Emergency Medical Centers: Emerging Trends in a New Model of Care<br/><br/>Purpose: The primary purpose is to provide an operational analyses of a new Emergency Services care model; thereby, increasing awareness within the national Emergency Medicine community with the model of Free Standing Emergency Medical Centers (FEMC) and their capabilities. <br/><br/>Background: FEMCs have existed in Texas since 2002. With the passage of Texas House bill 1357 in 2009, FEMCs are now being licensed throughout the state of Texas. With the major challenges facing emergency care delivery throughout the country, FEMCs will compliment traditional hospital-based emergency care delivery.<br/><br/>Design: Quantitative and qualitative data and descriptive analyses of data from business operations of a successful FEMC model in the State of Texas. The data is retrospective from business operations years 2005 to 2010.<br/><br/>Setting: FEMC’s operating in or around major Texas metropolitan cities of Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth and Austin.<br/><br/>Participants: Twelve (12) FEMCs near major Texas metropolitan cities (Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth and Austin). Each facility operates under an individual license while being part of a larger single enterprise. <br/><br/>Methods: Qualitative and quantitative data analyses highlighting operational benchmarks including percentage of inpatient admissions, Top 10 diagnosis, age groups served, lab volumes, patient safety, patient satisfaction results, employee satisfaction results, and overall fiscal performance. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: FEMCs can be a valuable adjunct to community hospital based ED’s promoting highly satisfied patients and employees. This model can successfully provide rapid, accurate diagnosis and treatment for patients of all levels of acuity. Impact on Emergency Department overcrowding can be evidenced when transferred patients arrive with completed diagnostics tests, imaging, a working diagnosis and treatment in progress. Diagnostic specimens are collected, completed and reported by the bedside caregiver, so the opportunity for error is diminished and patient safety enhanced.<br/><br/>Implications: FEMCs are an emerging component in the continuum of Emergency Care. This model also provides the Emergency Care consumer with quality options for care provided by experienced Emergency Physicians and Emergency Nurses. As this model becomes more widely understood and accepted amongst the Emergency Community, there is a potential partnership for easing ED overcrowding and surge capacity solutions for community based EDs.<br/><br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:46:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:46:29Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:46:29Z-
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