Assessing the Safety of Antimicrobial Textiles to be Worn by Health Care Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198345
Title:
Assessing the Safety of Antimicrobial Textiles to be Worn by Health Care Workers
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation] Assessing the Safety of Antimicrobial Textiles to be Worn by Health Care Workers

Purpose: Reducing the transmission of contaminants, pharmaceuticals and/or bacteria via health care worker (HCW) and patient worn materials is of crucial importance to Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Current CDC Guidelines state “HCWs who have contact with patients, body fluids, or specimens have a higher risk of acquiring or transmitting infections. HCWs may also acquire infections from or transmit infections to patients, other personnel, household members, or other community contacts.” The use of an effective barrier such as an antimicrobial treated textile worn by HCWs may protect them from both the transfer of microorganisms or possible contamination from trauma procedures. We conducted this study to assess the safety of antimicrobial treated textiles by in vivo and in vitro methods on both human skin and cell lines.

Design: Experimental

Setting: Independent Laboratory Testing Facility

Participants/Subjects: in vivo testing was done on Human subjects. We conducted testing on a group of healthy volunteers (2 female, 2 male) above the age of 18 years. These subjects were selected by a dermatologist and trained to self-assess skin reaction to the treated test areas.

in vitro testing was done using L929 cells (ATCC CCL1, NCTC clone 929nL (DSMZ)), passage #45. This cell line is the standard for testing medical device cytotoxicity.

Methods: Test 1 was conducted in vivo whereas Test 2 was conducted in vitro. Both tests were conducted by independent laboratories to assess the toxicity of fabric treatments on human skin and cell lines.

Test 1 used a 2.5 x 2.5 cm of pretreated fabric, moistened, and then applied to subject’s right arm then wrapped with untreated gauze while the left arm was used as a control. The reaction to the skin was observed at 0, 15 and 30 mins, and 1, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Treatment sites were examined for signs of irritation and graded using a standardized scale (refer table 1).

Test 2 used cells cultured in DMEM supplemented with 10% FBS. The treated fabric was initially incubated with an acid perspiration solution at 37°C for 24 hrs followed by incubation with the original extract in dilutions of 33.3% and 9.9%. Cytotoxicity was measured by comparing protein quantities present in experimental versus non-exposed control cells.

Results/Outcomes: Test 1 results demonstrated no remarkable signs of irritation. Thus it was concluded that the treated fabric is safe for external application and wear by HCWs.

Test 2 results yielded a 9% inhibition of cytotoxicity. There was no observed dose-dependent inhibition of L929 cell growth. Thus, there was no observation of the release of cellular substances that would lead to cutaneous irritation.

Implications: Textiles impregnated with the Vetagen antimicrobial passed both standard tests for evaluating the safety of products used in the health care setting. Although further testing of Vestagen’s antimicrobial is warranted, the results of this study show that the textiles do not exhibit cytotoxic effects on the epidermis of the wearer. Therefore it is plausible that due to their safety, textiles with Vestagen’s antimicrobial impregnation may reduce the transmission of contaminants, and pathogens for HCWs in the ED.


Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleAssessing the Safety of Antimicrobial Textiles to be Worn by Health Care Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198345-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation] Assessing the Safety of Antimicrobial Textiles to be Worn by Health Care Workers<br/><br/>Purpose: Reducing the transmission of contaminants, pharmaceuticals and/or bacteria via health care worker (HCW) and patient worn materials is of crucial importance to Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Current CDC Guidelines state “HCWs who have contact with patients, body fluids, or specimens have a higher risk of acquiring or transmitting infections. HCWs may also acquire infections from or transmit infections to patients, other personnel, household members, or other community contacts.” The use of an effective barrier such as an antimicrobial treated textile worn by HCWs may protect them from both the transfer of microorganisms or possible contamination from trauma procedures. We conducted this study to assess the safety of antimicrobial treated textiles by in vivo and in vitro methods on both human skin and cell lines. <br/><br/>Design: Experimental<br/><br/>Setting: Independent Laboratory Testing Facility<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: in vivo testing was done on Human subjects. We conducted testing on a group of healthy volunteers (2 female, 2 male) above the age of 18 years. These subjects were selected by a dermatologist and trained to self-assess skin reaction to the treated test areas.<br/><br/>in vitro testing was done using L929 cells (ATCC CCL1, NCTC clone 929nL (DSMZ)), passage #45. This cell line is the standard for testing medical device cytotoxicity.<br/><br/>Methods: Test 1 was conducted in vivo whereas Test 2 was conducted in vitro. Both tests were conducted by independent laboratories to assess the toxicity of fabric treatments on human skin and cell lines.<br/><br/>Test 1 used a 2.5 x 2.5 cm of pretreated fabric, moistened, and then applied to subject’s right arm then wrapped with untreated gauze while the left arm was used as a control. The reaction to the skin was observed at 0, 15 and 30 mins, and 1, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Treatment sites were examined for signs of irritation and graded using a standardized scale (refer table 1). <br/><br/>Test 2 used cells cultured in DMEM supplemented with 10% FBS. The treated fabric was initially incubated with an acid perspiration solution at 37°C for 24 hrs followed by incubation with the original extract in dilutions of 33.3% and 9.9%. Cytotoxicity was measured by comparing protein quantities present in experimental versus non-exposed control cells. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Test 1 results demonstrated no remarkable signs of irritation. Thus it was concluded that the treated fabric is safe for external application and wear by HCWs.<br/><br/>Test 2 results yielded a 9% inhibition of cytotoxicity. There was no observed dose-dependent inhibition of L929 cell growth. Thus, there was no observation of the release of cellular substances that would lead to cutaneous irritation.<br/><br/>Implications: Textiles impregnated with the Vetagen antimicrobial passed both standard tests for evaluating the safety of products used in the health care setting. Although further testing of Vestagen’s antimicrobial is warranted, the results of this study show that the textiles do not exhibit cytotoxic effects on the epidermis of the wearer. Therefore it is plausible that due to their safety, textiles with Vestagen’s antimicrobial impregnation may reduce the transmission of contaminants, and pathogens for HCWs in the ED.<br/><br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:46:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:46:39Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:46:39Z-
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