2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198351
Title:
Discharge Phone Calls
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]Discharge Phone Calls

Purpose: Current literature suggests that calling patients after they leave the emergency department identifies opportunities to clarify patients understanding of their discharge instructions and provide immediate feedback about their experience in the emergency department. In April of 2010, we initiated discharge phone calls to confirm and evaluate these findings.

Design: A performance improvement process of discharge phone calls was implemented to focus on improving the patient satisfaction in the emergency department.
Outcome goals included ensuring patients felt they had necessary information to continue care at home, and addressing any immediate concerns with their patient experience.

Setting: A non-teaching community Level III emergency department with 52 beds and 70,000 visits annually.

Subjects: We focused on three categories of discharged patients to begin our follow up phone call process; the pediatric population, 0-17 years of age; the elderly population, 75 years of age and older; and any patient identified by the primary nurse who would benefit from follow-up.

Methods: Through collaboration of nursing leadership, physician, staff and the Shift Specialty Coordinators (Charge Nurse) we developed a script and evaluation tool. Planning meetings addressed potential barriers, and operational issues such as staffing needs, time constraints and identification of optimal patient populations. As this new process impacted several other emergency department processes, care was taken to identify all relevant stakeholders and education was offered to the staff during monthly meetings and weekly e-mails.

The Specialty Shift Coordinator calls all patients of the selected populations to evaluate three generalized topics; patients follow up, understanding of instructions, and evaluation of care.

Results: Patient response was immediately positive, and significant improvement in our patient satisfaction scores was identified within two months, and has steadily increased throughout the year. This new process has provided opportunity for improvement for our department to effectively treat our community to which we serve.

Implications: The implementation of discharge phone calls on the targeted population listed above has exceeded our initial goals of improving patient satisfaction. We are continuing to reach those at risk population patients needing follow up care. Currently, we continue to implement discharge phone calls on a daily basis. Feedback obtained by doing phone calls has showed us that patient satisfaction has increased.

Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleDischarge Phone Callsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198351-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]Discharge Phone Calls<br/><br/>Purpose: Current literature suggests that calling patients after they leave the emergency department identifies opportunities to clarify patients understanding of their discharge instructions and provide immediate feedback about their experience in the emergency department. In April of 2010, we initiated discharge phone calls to confirm and evaluate these findings. <br/><br/>Design: A performance improvement process of discharge phone calls was implemented to focus on improving the patient satisfaction in the emergency department.<br/>Outcome goals included ensuring patients felt they had necessary information to continue care at home, and addressing any immediate concerns with their patient experience. <br/><br/>Setting: A non-teaching community Level III emergency department with 52 beds and 70,000 visits annually.<br/><br/>Subjects: We focused on three categories of discharged patients to begin our follow up phone call process; the pediatric population, 0-17 years of age; the elderly population, 75 years of age and older; and any patient identified by the primary nurse who would benefit from follow-up. <br/><br/>Methods: Through collaboration of nursing leadership, physician, staff and the Shift Specialty Coordinators (Charge Nurse) we developed a script and evaluation tool. Planning meetings addressed potential barriers, and operational issues such as staffing needs, time constraints and identification of optimal patient populations. As this new process impacted several other emergency department processes, care was taken to identify all relevant stakeholders and education was offered to the staff during monthly meetings and weekly e-mails. <br/><br/>The Specialty Shift Coordinator calls all patients of the selected populations to evaluate three generalized topics; patients follow up, understanding of instructions, and evaluation of care. <br/><br/>Results: Patient response was immediately positive, and significant improvement in our patient satisfaction scores was identified within two months, and has steadily increased throughout the year. This new process has provided opportunity for improvement for our department to effectively treat our community to which we serve. <br/><br/>Implications: The implementation of discharge phone calls on the targeted population listed above has exceeded our initial goals of improving patient satisfaction. We are continuing to reach those at risk population patients needing follow up care. Currently, we continue to implement discharge phone calls on a daily basis. Feedback obtained by doing phone calls has showed us that patient satisfaction has increased.<br/> <br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:46:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:46:57Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:46:57Z-
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