2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198352
Title:
A Description of Pain Experienced by Immediate Care Center Patients
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation]A Description of Pain Experienced by Immediate Care Center Patients

Purpose: While conducting monthly pain audits, RNs noted that many patients present with pain, but few are treated and were not often reassessed for the effectiveness of the intervention. The objective of the research was to determine how many patients present to the Immediate Care Center (ICC) with a complaint of pain, what type of pain was common, and upon presentation of pain did the patient receive either a pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention with a reassessment.

Design: This is a descriptive research study using a convenient sample. The ICC developed signage to inform our patients that a research study was being conducted and that they may be asked to participate. Their medical record number identified participants and participation was voluntary. An inclusion criterion was a complaint of pain. The non-verbal patients were assessed using the FLACC, Visual Analog, or FACES pain scale. The estimated sample size was dependent upon the number of ICC visits during the study time frame of 1/12/2010 – 1/26/2010. Limitations to the study included: patient safety (no transportation available, currently medicated), no order for pharmacological intervention, nurse and doctor bias related to pain perception, and drug seeking patients.

Setting: A suburban ICC affiliated with a 160-bed community hospital.
Participants/Subjects: All patients who presented to the ICC during the study time frame were invited to participate. During the study period at the ICC, 1777 patients were evaluated, 1018 of those patients complained of pain equaling 57%. Young and middle adult populations, which consist of those 19 years of age to 65 years, comprised 62% of the pain population.
Methods: A retrospective chart review was used to compile the data. Data variables were age, type of pain, and documentation of treatment and reassessment.

Results/Outcomes : Pain is one of the main reasons patients come to the ICC. Only 64, or 6%, of those patients were treated for their complaint of pain. Treatments consisted of splinting, ice, warm compresses, elevation, and medications. 9 of the 64 patients, or 14%, that were treated were reevaluated for effectiveness of the pain intervention. Sore throat was the leading complaint of pain with 227 complaints. The ICC has some limiting factors related to treatment and evaluation of pain. Quick turn around times associated with an ICC visit allow minimal time for pain interventions to take effect. Patients drive themselves to the ICC, therefore limiting the pharmacological pain interventions that can be initiated. The ICC anticipates that better treatment of pain will improve patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and nurse satisfaction.

Implications: The ICC plans on implementing an education program for all staff focused on the assessment, treatment, reassessment and documentation of pain. The ICC will create pain protocols that can be initiated by the RNs. It is anticipated that the Nurse Initiated Pain Protocols (NIPP) will increase the number of patients being treated for pain and will increase reassessments and documentation. The ICC will be conducting further research in 2011 to evaluate the effectiveness of the NIPP.




Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleA Description of Pain Experienced by Immediate Care Center Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198352-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Research Presentation]A Description of Pain Experienced by Immediate Care Center Patients<br/><br/>Purpose: While conducting monthly pain audits, RNs noted that many patients present with pain, but few are treated and were not often reassessed for the effectiveness of the intervention. The objective of the research was to determine how many patients present to the Immediate Care Center (ICC) with a complaint of pain, what type of pain was common, and upon presentation of pain did the patient receive either a pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention with a reassessment. <br/><br/>Design: This is a descriptive research study using a convenient sample. The ICC developed signage to inform our patients that a research study was being conducted and that they may be asked to participate. Their medical record number identified participants and participation was voluntary. An inclusion criterion was a complaint of pain. The non-verbal patients were assessed using the FLACC, Visual Analog, or FACES pain scale. The estimated sample size was dependent upon the number of ICC visits during the study time frame of 1/12/2010 – 1/26/2010. Limitations to the study included: patient safety (no transportation available, currently medicated), no order for pharmacological intervention, nurse and doctor bias related to pain perception, and drug seeking patients.<br/><br/>Setting: A suburban ICC affiliated with a 160-bed community hospital.<br/>Participants/Subjects: All patients who presented to the ICC during the study time frame were invited to participate. During the study period at the ICC, 1777 patients were evaluated, 1018 of those patients complained of pain equaling 57%. Young and middle adult populations, which consist of those 19 years of age to 65 years, comprised 62% of the pain population. <br/>Methods: A retrospective chart review was used to compile the data. Data variables were age, type of pain, and documentation of treatment and reassessment.<br/><br/>Results/Outcomes : Pain is one of the main reasons patients come to the ICC. Only 64, or 6%, of those patients were treated for their complaint of pain. Treatments consisted of splinting, ice, warm compresses, elevation, and medications. 9 of the 64 patients, or 14%, that were treated were reevaluated for effectiveness of the pain intervention. Sore throat was the leading complaint of pain with 227 complaints. The ICC has some limiting factors related to treatment and evaluation of pain. Quick turn around times associated with an ICC visit allow minimal time for pain interventions to take effect. Patients drive themselves to the ICC, therefore limiting the pharmacological pain interventions that can be initiated. The ICC anticipates that better treatment of pain will improve patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and nurse satisfaction. <br/><br/>Implications: The ICC plans on implementing an education program for all staff focused on the assessment, treatment, reassessment and documentation of pain. The ICC will create pain protocols that can be initiated by the RNs. It is anticipated that the Nurse Initiated Pain Protocols (NIPP) will increase the number of patients being treated for pain and will increase reassessments and documentation. The ICC will be conducting further research in 2011 to evaluate the effectiveness of the NIPP.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:47:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:47:00Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:47:00Z-
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