2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/198360
Title:
From Z to A in the Trauma Bay: A Mentoring Program
Abstract:
[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Z to A in the Trauma Bay: a Mentoring Program

Problem: Although the Emergency Department has an existing orientation process for newly hired nurses, there remained an educational void specific to caring for the trauma patient. During a staff needs assessment survey the nurses voiced a desire for structured trauma education.

Design: In order to address this void, the Trauma Nurse Mentoring Program was developed by a staff educator and trauma coordinator and implemented with assistance from a clinical coordinator and volunteer nurse mentors.

Setting: An urban academic medical center Emergency Department with Level One trauma status in Midwestern United States.

Participants: Associate or Bachelor degree prepared staff nurses with at least six months experience working in the Emergency Department.

Methods: The program is a four hour class formatted to address all learning styles. It begins with lecture focusing on an overview of EMS, trauma activation criteria, kinematics, and documentation requirements. Next, participants are thoroughly oriented to the trauma bay, supplies, and equipment. Additionally, policies and procedures specific to trauma care are reviewed. To encourage communication and facilitate collaborative care with the trauma team, the class culminates with a trauma attending who leads the nurses through each step of a mock patient scenario from the initial EMS call to admission or discharge. To define nursing roles participants act as primary or documentation nurse and return demonstrate proper equipment use and charting. Participants then pair with an experienced nurse colleague who serves as a mentor for a total of six trauma activations and one arrest. The mentor is a resource and guide to the participant as they gain confidence and skills in their role as trauma nurse. Measurement tools for the program include a base line self-assessment that evaluates the nurse’s credentials and trauma experience, in addition to, a trauma knowledge exam and evaluation after the class is completed. The tools are designed to reinforce teaching points and obtain feedback from the participants regarding future learning needs. Three months after entering the program the self-assessment tool is redistributed and compared with the baseline to evaluate the success of the nurse’s experience and identify improvements to be made within the program.

Result/Outcomes: The program has been in effect for six months and twenty five nurses have participated. Of those, nine have fulfilled the requirements and completed the program. Evaluations show that the content of the program has received the highest rating of “excellent” 88% of the time. Participants express their appreciation for the increased confidence, definition of roles and expectations, and improved relationship with the surgical team that this opportunity has provided them.

Implications: The Trauma Nurse Mentoring Program is meeting its goal of filling the trauma care educational void in the Emergency Department and has strengthened the relationship with the surgical team. In times of budget cuts and reallocation of educational hours, it is strongly recommended that all newly hired nurses complete the program going forward and that orientation hours are preserved to guarantee quality care of the trauma patient.
Repository Posting Date:
21-Dec-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Dec-2011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleFrom Z to A in the Trauma Bay: A Mentoring Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/198360-
dc.description.abstract[ENA Annual Conference 2011 - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] Z to A in the Trauma Bay: a Mentoring Program<br/><br/>Problem: Although the Emergency Department has an existing orientation process for newly hired nurses, there remained an educational void specific to caring for the trauma patient. During a staff needs assessment survey the nurses voiced a desire for structured trauma education. <br/><br/>Design: In order to address this void, the Trauma Nurse Mentoring Program was developed by a staff educator and trauma coordinator and implemented with assistance from a clinical coordinator and volunteer nurse mentors. <br/><br/>Setting: An urban academic medical center Emergency Department with Level One trauma status in Midwestern United States. <br/><br/>Participants: Associate or Bachelor degree prepared staff nurses with at least six months experience working in the Emergency Department.<br/><br/>Methods: The program is a four hour class formatted to address all learning styles. It begins with lecture focusing on an overview of EMS, trauma activation criteria, kinematics, and documentation requirements. Next, participants are thoroughly oriented to the trauma bay, supplies, and equipment. Additionally, policies and procedures specific to trauma care are reviewed. To encourage communication and facilitate collaborative care with the trauma team, the class culminates with a trauma attending who leads the nurses through each step of a mock patient scenario from the initial EMS call to admission or discharge. To define nursing roles participants act as primary or documentation nurse and return demonstrate proper equipment use and charting. Participants then pair with an experienced nurse colleague who serves as a mentor for a total of six trauma activations and one arrest. The mentor is a resource and guide to the participant as they gain confidence and skills in their role as trauma nurse. Measurement tools for the program include a base line self-assessment that evaluates the nurse’s credentials and trauma experience, in addition to, a trauma knowledge exam and evaluation after the class is completed. The tools are designed to reinforce teaching points and obtain feedback from the participants regarding future learning needs. Three months after entering the program the self-assessment tool is redistributed and compared with the baseline to evaluate the success of the nurse’s experience and identify improvements to be made within the program. <br/><br/>Result/Outcomes: The program has been in effect for six months and twenty five nurses have participated. Of those, nine have fulfilled the requirements and completed the program. Evaluations show that the content of the program has received the highest rating of “excellent” 88% of the time. Participants express their appreciation for the increased confidence, definition of roles and expectations, and improved relationship with the surgical team that this opportunity has provided them.<br/><br/>Implications: The Trauma Nurse Mentoring Program is meeting its goal of filling the trauma care educational void in the Emergency Department and has strengthened the relationship with the surgical team. In times of budget cuts and reallocation of educational hours, it is strongly recommended that all newly hired nurses complete the program going forward and that orientation hours are preserved to guarantee quality care of the trauma patient. <br/>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-12-21T12:47:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-21T12:47:25Z-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T12:47:25Z-
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