Examining the Relationship Between Vitamin D Status and Glycemic Control in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Role of Inflammatory Mediators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201582
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Relationship Between Vitamin D Status and Glycemic Control in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Role of Inflammatory Mediators
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Vitamin D deficiency is markedly prevalent in children and adolescents particularly in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Over the past decade, there has been a growing body of evidence that vitamin D deficiency is related to impaired glucose metabolism, increased risk of diabetes, and altered immune responses; however, it is not known whether vitamin D deficiency is related to impaired glucose metabolism and altered immune responses in children and adolescents with T1DM. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D) and glycemic control (HbA1c), and to determine whether inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10) mediate this relationship in children and adolescents with T1DM. A cross-sectional design will be used to examine these relationships in a convenience sample of 204 children and adolescents with T1DM (age range; 7 to 18 years); recruited at the Diabetes Center for Children at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Demographic and disease-related covariates including HbA1c will be retrieved from medical records. A 10_ml blood sample will be collected from each study participant to measure serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, inflammatory cytokines, and blood glucose level. I will be performing assays to measure inflammatory cytokines and blood glucose level at the Biobehavioral Research Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing. Data analysis will entail descriptive statistics, general linear modeling analyses and bootstrapping analysis. This study is innovative; it combines clinical and bench research and utilizes an outstanding approach for data analysis; thus making it the model for nursing science of the 21st century. The knowledge gained from this study 1) may guide the direction of future research and 2) may be useful for developing clinical guidelines to reduce the magnitude of vitamin D deficiency and thus may help improve glycemic control in this population.
Keywords:
glycemic control; type 1 diabetes; vitamin D
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Relationship Between Vitamin D Status and Glycemic Control in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Role of Inflammatory Mediatorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201582-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Vitamin D deficiency is markedly prevalent in children and adolescents particularly in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Over the past decade, there has been a growing body of evidence that vitamin D deficiency is related to impaired glucose metabolism, increased risk of diabetes, and altered immune responses; however, it is not known whether vitamin D deficiency is related to impaired glucose metabolism and altered immune responses in children and adolescents with T1DM. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D) and glycemic control (HbA1c), and to determine whether inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10) mediate this relationship in children and adolescents with T1DM. A cross-sectional design will be used to examine these relationships in a convenience sample of 204 children and adolescents with T1DM (age range; 7 to 18 years); recruited at the Diabetes Center for Children at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Demographic and disease-related covariates including HbA1c will be retrieved from medical records. A 10_ml blood sample will be collected from each study participant to measure serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, inflammatory cytokines, and blood glucose level. I will be performing assays to measure inflammatory cytokines and blood glucose level at the Biobehavioral Research Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing. Data analysis will entail descriptive statistics, general linear modeling analyses and bootstrapping analysis. This study is innovative; it combines clinical and bench research and utilizes an outstanding approach for data analysis; thus making it the model for nursing science of the 21st century. The knowledge gained from this study 1) may guide the direction of future research and 2) may be useful for developing clinical guidelines to reduce the magnitude of vitamin D deficiency and thus may help improve glycemic control in this population.en_GB
dc.subjectglycemic controlen_GB
dc.subjecttype 1 diabetesen_GB
dc.subjectvitamin Den_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:41:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:41:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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