Factors Influencing Hospital Nurse's Incident Reporting Culture in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201591
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Hospital Nurse's Incident Reporting Culture in Taiwan
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Although nurses are responsible to report medical incidents to improve patient safety and healthcare quality, there is a deficit of information in understanding hospital nurses’ perceptions of incident reporting culture (IRC). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the nurses’ IRC and work behaviors related to patient safety (WBPS) and negative experiences of reporting such as stress and administrator’s blame attitude. Method: A mail survey with self-administered questionnaires was conducted in 3 medical centers and 6 regional hospitals in Taiwan. In total, 1109 frontline nurses (response rate: 83%) were participated from 2008 to 2009. Data was collected by using the Incident Reporting Culture Questionnaire (20 items; Cronbach’s?0.83), Safety Organizing Behavior Scale (9 items; Cronbach’s?0.92), levels of perceived stress and being blame, and experiences of failures in reporting. Results: The participants had mean age of 31.85 (SD=5.20) and 65.3% of them (n=723) held baccalaureate degree and above. Their average tenure of present work was 6.13 years and 38.8% (n=430) of them had failures in reporting. The nurses perceived low to moderate stress and sometimes received administrator’s blame attitude from reporting incidents. The IRC was significantly correlated with the perceived stress (r = -0.15), administrator’s blame attitude (r = -0.18), WBPS (r = 0.44), willingness of reporting (r = 0.31) and work tenure (r = 0.19). The stepwise regression of the IRC on these five factors accounted for 26.1% of the variance (p < 0.001). The nurse’s WBPS accounted for 17.9% variance in the IRC (p=0.001). Conclusions: The reporting culture is substantially influenced by the work behaviors related to patient safety and reporting willingness among nurses. In addition, hospital administrators and safety specialists need to pay attentions on nurses’ perceptions of stress and being blame while building a positive incident reporting culture.
Keywords:
safety management; patient safety; incident reporting culture
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Hospital Nurse's Incident Reporting Culture in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201591-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Although nurses are responsible to report medical incidents to improve patient safety and healthcare quality, there is a deficit of information in understanding hospital nurses’ perceptions of incident reporting culture (IRC). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the nurses’ IRC and work behaviors related to patient safety (WBPS) and negative experiences of reporting such as stress and administrator’s blame attitude. Method: A mail survey with self-administered questionnaires was conducted in 3 medical centers and 6 regional hospitals in Taiwan. In total, 1109 frontline nurses (response rate: 83%) were participated from 2008 to 2009. Data was collected by using the Incident Reporting Culture Questionnaire (20 items; Cronbach’s?0.83), Safety Organizing Behavior Scale (9 items; Cronbach’s?0.92), levels of perceived stress and being blame, and experiences of failures in reporting. Results: The participants had mean age of 31.85 (SD=5.20) and 65.3% of them (n=723) held baccalaureate degree and above. Their average tenure of present work was 6.13 years and 38.8% (n=430) of them had failures in reporting. The nurses perceived low to moderate stress and sometimes received administrator’s blame attitude from reporting incidents. The IRC was significantly correlated with the perceived stress (r = -0.15), administrator’s blame attitude (r = -0.18), WBPS (r = 0.44), willingness of reporting (r = 0.31) and work tenure (r = 0.19). The stepwise regression of the IRC on these five factors accounted for 26.1% of the variance (p < 0.001). The nurse’s WBPS accounted for 17.9% variance in the IRC (p=0.001). Conclusions: The reporting culture is substantially influenced by the work behaviors related to patient safety and reporting willingness among nurses. In addition, hospital administrators and safety specialists need to pay attentions on nurses’ perceptions of stress and being blame while building a positive incident reporting culture.en_GB
dc.subjectsafety managementen_GB
dc.subjectpatient safetyen_GB
dc.subjectincident reporting cultureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:41:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:41:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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