Exploring Family Caregivers' Experience and Associated Factors While They Consented to “Do Not Resuscitate” for Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201607
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Family Caregivers' Experience and Associated Factors While They Consented to “Do Not Resuscitate” for Cancer Patients
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Exploring family caregivers’ experience and associated factors while they consented to Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) for cancer patients. Methods: This study was a descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study. Eighty cancer patients’ family caregivers were invited to participate in this study. Study instrument was a structured questionnaire. Content of the instrument included patients and their family caregivers’ individual characteristics, caregivers’ caring situation, The Chinese version of the short form of Profile of Mood States, M. D. Anderson symptom inventory: Taiwan Form, Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers, and 8 self-developed items related to family caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR. In this study, the Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers and a self-developed scale related to family caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR were used to measure caregivers’ experience. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation test, and hierarchical regression analysis. Results: Caregivers’ experience measured by Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers was associated with family caregivers’ emotional status. Patients’ age, family caregivers' age, educational level, living with patients or not, patients’ symptom severity and symptom interference with life and functional status perceived by family caregivers, and family caregivers’ emotional status were related to caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR. Hierarchical regression model accounted for 73.1% (p= 0.00) of variance in family caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR and the main predictors included patients’ living wills, family caregivers' age, gender, educational level, living with patients or not, and emotional status. Conclusion: Study results of this study could be used to develop clinical education programs about end of life care. We hope that effective communications between patients, family caregivers, and health care providers would improve the care of cancer patients and their family caregivers, and ease family caregivers’ negative experience while they consented to DNR.
Keywords:
Family caregivers; Cancer patients; Do Not Resuscitate
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Family Caregivers' Experience and Associated Factors While They Consented to “Do Not Resuscitate” for Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201607-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Exploring family caregivers’ experience and associated factors while they consented to Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) for cancer patients. Methods: This study was a descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study. Eighty cancer patients’ family caregivers were invited to participate in this study. Study instrument was a structured questionnaire. Content of the instrument included patients and their family caregivers’ individual characteristics, caregivers’ caring situation, The Chinese version of the short form of Profile of Mood States, M. D. Anderson symptom inventory: Taiwan Form, Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers, and 8 self-developed items related to family caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR. In this study, the Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers and a self-developed scale related to family caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR were used to measure caregivers’ experience. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation test, and hierarchical regression analysis. Results: Caregivers’ experience measured by Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers was associated with family caregivers’ emotional status. Patients’ age, family caregivers' age, educational level, living with patients or not, patients’ symptom severity and symptom interference with life and functional status perceived by family caregivers, and family caregivers’ emotional status were related to caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR. Hierarchical regression model accounted for 73.1% (p= 0.00) of variance in family caregivers’ experience of consenting to DNR and the main predictors included patients’ living wills, family caregivers' age, gender, educational level, living with patients or not, and emotional status. Conclusion: Study results of this study could be used to develop clinical education programs about end of life care. We hope that effective communications between patients, family caregivers, and health care providers would improve the care of cancer patients and their family caregivers, and ease family caregivers’ negative experience while they consented to DNR.en_GB
dc.subjectFamily caregiversen_GB
dc.subjectCancer patientsen_GB
dc.subjectDo Not Resuscitateen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:42:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:42:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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