Program Evaluation of a Novel BSN Curriculum: Clinical Immersion

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201654
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Program Evaluation of a Novel BSN Curriculum: Clinical Immersion
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The Clinical Immersion Curriculum (CIC) was implemented five years ago in response to limitations in clinical and faculty resources and changes in the health care environment. The CIC is a non-traditional approach to nursing education whereby students complete a comprehensive curriculum prior to immersion in the clinical arena during the senior year. Pre-clinical courses are augmented by field and simulation laboratory experiences, a work study requirement, and mentoring by student teaching assistants. Since implementation, 583 students have completed their Bachelor of Science in Nursing.  Curriculum outcomes were evaluated by comparison of pre- and post-implementation NCLEX pass rates, pre- and post-exit and alumni survey data, student surveys, and a student focus group. Since inception of the CIC, NCLEX pass rates have increased from 88% to 92%. Exit and alumni survey data, collected using the Educational Benchmarking Incorporated (EBI) program, provided an assessment of learning outcomes, institutional resources, and overall program effectiveness as perceived by graduates. Results were benchmarked with all participating schools. The exit survey results indicated an increase in the program’s overall effectiveness five years after implementation; post-implementation scores on key variables were consistently higher than all reported benchmarks. On the alumni surveys, overall program effectiveness decreased slightly post-implementation; however, poor pre- and post-implementation response rates confound the results.  A survey of senior students confirmed the importance of key components of the novel curriculum and students overwhelmingly endorsed a perceived readiness for entry-level practice.  Eight senior students from the CIC participated in focus groups. Analysis revealed major themes related to program components, clinical issues, ideas for improvement, and preparation for graduation. Taken as a whole, outcome data indicates that the CIC is at least as effective as a traditional baccalaureate nursing program and requires fewer faculty and clinical resources. 
Keywords:
baccalaureate nursing; program evaluation; nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProgram Evaluation of a Novel BSN Curriculum: Clinical Immersionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201654-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The Clinical Immersion Curriculum (CIC) was implemented five years ago in response to limitations in clinical and faculty resources and changes in the health care environment. The CIC is a non-traditional approach to nursing education whereby students complete a comprehensive curriculum prior to immersion in the clinical arena during the senior year. Pre-clinical courses are augmented by field and simulation laboratory experiences, a work study requirement, and mentoring by student teaching assistants. Since implementation, 583 students have completed their Bachelor of Science in Nursing.  Curriculum outcomes were evaluated by comparison of pre- and post-implementation NCLEX pass rates, pre- and post-exit and alumni survey data, student surveys, and a student focus group. Since inception of the CIC, NCLEX pass rates have increased from 88% to 92%. Exit and alumni survey data, collected using the Educational Benchmarking Incorporated (EBI) program, provided an assessment of learning outcomes, institutional resources, and overall program effectiveness as perceived by graduates. Results were benchmarked with all participating schools. The exit survey results indicated an increase in the program’s overall effectiveness five years after implementation; post-implementation scores on key variables were consistently higher than all reported benchmarks. On the alumni surveys, overall program effectiveness decreased slightly post-implementation; however, poor pre- and post-implementation response rates confound the results.  A survey of senior students confirmed the importance of key components of the novel curriculum and students overwhelmingly endorsed a perceived readiness for entry-level practice.  Eight senior students from the CIC participated in focus groups. Analysis revealed major themes related to program components, clinical issues, ideas for improvement, and preparation for graduation. Taken as a whole, outcome data indicates that the CIC is at least as effective as a traditional baccalaureate nursing program and requires fewer faculty and clinical resources. en_GB
dc.subjectbaccalaureate nursingen_GB
dc.subjectprogram evaluationen_GB
dc.subjectnursing educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:45:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:45:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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