Hemolysis of Blood Specimens: Increasing Time in the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201658
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hemolysis of Blood Specimens: Increasing Time in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Non-experimental descriptive quantitative design was selected to compare hemolysis of blood drawn via newly established IV site and the venipuncture site. Setting:  This study was conducted in a Level 2 ED of a 220-bed non-profit, teaching hospital.  The ED volume was approximately 53,000 visits for fiscal year 2009. Participants/Subjects:  A convenience sample of 101 hemolyzed blood specimens drawn in the ED January, 2009- November, 2009 were included in this study, excluding specimens collected from minors, mastectomy, and dialysis patients. Methods:  IV site blood specimens were collected by randomly selected ED nurses with 2 or more years of ED experience, and the venipuncture specimens were collected by randomly selected ED technicians with 2 or more years of ED experience.   Hemolyzed specimens were stratified according to method of specimen retrieval:  Group A = venipuncture and Group B= IV site. Using SPSS,  Chi-Square was used to compare the groups. Results/Outcomes:  Of the 101 hemolyzed specimens, 65 (64.4%) were drawn by newly placed 20g IV catheter, while 36 (35.6%) were drawn by 21-23g venipuncture needle.  There was a significant difference in the proportion of hemolysis in the two specimen collection methods, x2 (1, N= 101) =8.327; p<.01. Implications:  A decreased hemolysis rate would result in improved ED throughput, reduced length of stay for the patient, and improved patient satisfaction. Based on these results and review of evidence from other sources, a policy was developed describing the process for obtaining blood specimens for laboratory patient testing in the ED. 
Keywords:
Hemolysis; Emergency
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHemolysis of Blood Specimens: Increasing Time in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201658-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Non-experimental descriptive quantitative design was selected to compare hemolysis of blood drawn via newly established IV site and the venipuncture site. Setting:  This study was conducted in a Level 2 ED of a 220-bed non-profit, teaching hospital.  The ED volume was approximately 53,000 visits for fiscal year 2009. Participants/Subjects:  A convenience sample of 101 hemolyzed blood specimens drawn in the ED January, 2009- November, 2009 were included in this study, excluding specimens collected from minors, mastectomy, and dialysis patients. Methods:  IV site blood specimens were collected by randomly selected ED nurses with 2 or more years of ED experience, and the venipuncture specimens were collected by randomly selected ED technicians with 2 or more years of ED experience.   Hemolyzed specimens were stratified according to method of specimen retrieval:  Group A = venipuncture and Group B= IV site. Using SPSS,  Chi-Square was used to compare the groups. Results/Outcomes:  Of the 101 hemolyzed specimens, 65 (64.4%) were drawn by newly placed 20g IV catheter, while 36 (35.6%) were drawn by 21-23g venipuncture needle.  There was a significant difference in the proportion of hemolysis in the two specimen collection methods, x2 (1, N= 101) =8.327; p<.01. Implications:  A decreased hemolysis rate would result in improved ED throughput, reduced length of stay for the patient, and improved patient satisfaction. Based on these results and review of evidence from other sources, a policy was developed describing the process for obtaining blood specimens for laboratory patient testing in the ED. en_GB
dc.subjectHemolysisen_GB
dc.subjectEmergencyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:45:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:45:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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