Characteristics Predictive of Lifestyle Change Among Older Adults with Hypertension

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201664
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics Predictive of Lifestyle Change Among Older Adults with Hypertension
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational predictive design study is to develop a prediction model of demographic and sociobehavioral characteristics that are common among older adults with hypertension (HTN) who engage in therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC). HTN is ranked as the most common primary diagnosis in the United States affecting 67% of adults aged 60 and older, a number expected to continue increasing given the positive association HTN has to age and the rapidly aging population of the United States. The control rate for all adults with HTN is 34% while the control rate for adults aged 60 and over is only 27%, a rate that has minimally improved since 1988. The challenge of improving HTN prevalence and control is particularly significant given the continuous and consistent relationship high blood pressure has to cardiovascular disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, and retinal diseases. Efforts to manage HTN involve a comprehensive approach that includes the adoption of TLC. Even with the known association between TLC and lowered blood pressure levels, studies indicate that inadequate or inconsistent attention is given to lifestyle risk factors.  A prediction model that generates an index score of the likelihood of engagement in TLC can help healthcare providers organize and prioritize care by targeting at-risk individuals and following up with appropriate interventions.  Challenges and issues in methodology for this research-in-progress study will be discussed. Preliminary findings will be shared.
Keywords:
Therapeutic lifestyle change; Hypertension; Older adult
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics Predictive of Lifestyle Change Among Older Adults with Hypertensionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201664-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational predictive design study is to develop a prediction model of demographic and sociobehavioral characteristics that are common among older adults with hypertension (HTN) who engage in therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC). HTN is ranked as the most common primary diagnosis in the United States affecting 67% of adults aged 60 and older, a number expected to continue increasing given the positive association HTN has to age and the rapidly aging population of the United States. The control rate for all adults with HTN is 34% while the control rate for adults aged 60 and over is only 27%, a rate that has minimally improved since 1988. The challenge of improving HTN prevalence and control is particularly significant given the continuous and consistent relationship high blood pressure has to cardiovascular disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, and retinal diseases. Efforts to manage HTN involve a comprehensive approach that includes the adoption of TLC. Even with the known association between TLC and lowered blood pressure levels, studies indicate that inadequate or inconsistent attention is given to lifestyle risk factors.  A prediction model that generates an index score of the likelihood of engagement in TLC can help healthcare providers organize and prioritize care by targeting at-risk individuals and following up with appropriate interventions.  Challenges and issues in methodology for this research-in-progress study will be discussed. Preliminary findings will be shared.en_GB
dc.subjectTherapeutic lifestyle changeen_GB
dc.subjectHypertensionen_GB
dc.subjectOlder adulten_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:46:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:46:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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