Demonstrating a Magnetic Work Environment: Results of a Nurse Mentoring Study on Predictors of Mentoring Benefits

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Demonstrating a Magnetic Work Environment: Results of a Nurse Mentoring Study on Predictors of Mentoring Benefits
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background/Purpose: Mentoring characteristics promote satisfaction and are valuable to nurse protégés. A need exists to explore benefits experienced by nurse protégés engaged in mentoring relationships. This descriptive, correlational study expands previous nursing research (Jakubik, 2007) by examining if quality, quantity, type of mentoring, and length of employment predict mentoring benefits as perceived by staff nurse protégés. Methods: A convenience sample from a Magnet-designated, pediatric hospital in midwestern United States completed a demographic questionnaire and two valid and reliable instruments: Quality of Mentoring Questionnaire and Jakubik Mentoring Benefits Questionnaire. Findings:  The hypothesis was accepted. Linear combination of quantity, quality and type of mentoring and length of employment predicts mentoring benefits better than any one factor alone.  Hypothesis testing by stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed an overall R = .63 with mentoring quality and length of employment entering the equation to explain 39.69% of the variance in the outcome variable mentoring benefits (p < .01).  Mentoring quality was significant, explaining 37.21% of variance in mentoring benefits (r = .61, p < .001).  The predictor variable length of employment was a small, but significant predictor of mentoring benefits, explaining 4.41% of the variance in mentoring benefits (r = .21, p < .006).  Neither quantity nor type of mentoring relationship was significantly related to mentoring benefits. Implications: Length of employment predicted the outcome variable mentoring benefits and added to the explained variance in mentoring benefits explained by mentoring quality. Findings suggest high-quality mentoring relationships may have a role in nurses’ longevity in an organization. The concept of nurse mentoring and experiences of staff nurse protégés demonstrate Magnet model components of Transformational Leadership; Structural Empowerment; Exemplary Professional Practice; New Knowledge, Innovations, and Improvements; and Empirical Quality Outcomes. Future research examining the role mentoring benefits has on predictors of retention and length of employment is needed.         
Keywords:
Magnet; mentoring; pediatric nursing
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDemonstrating a Magnetic Work Environment: Results of a Nurse Mentoring Study on Predictors of Mentoring Benefitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201678-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background/Purpose: Mentoring characteristics promote satisfaction and are valuable to nurse protégés. A need exists to explore benefits experienced by nurse protégés engaged in mentoring relationships. This descriptive, correlational study expands previous nursing research (Jakubik, 2007) by examining if quality, quantity, type of mentoring, and length of employment predict mentoring benefits as perceived by staff nurse protégés. Methods: A convenience sample from a Magnet-designated, pediatric hospital in midwestern United States completed a demographic questionnaire and two valid and reliable instruments: Quality of Mentoring Questionnaire and Jakubik Mentoring Benefits Questionnaire. Findings:  The hypothesis was accepted. Linear combination of quantity, quality and type of mentoring and length of employment predicts mentoring benefits better than any one factor alone.  Hypothesis testing by stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed an overall R = .63 with mentoring quality and length of employment entering the equation to explain 39.69% of the variance in the outcome variable mentoring benefits (p < .01).  Mentoring quality was significant, explaining 37.21% of variance in mentoring benefits (r = .61, p < .001).  The predictor variable length of employment was a small, but significant predictor of mentoring benefits, explaining 4.41% of the variance in mentoring benefits (r = .21, p < .006).  Neither quantity nor type of mentoring relationship was significantly related to mentoring benefits. Implications: Length of employment predicted the outcome variable mentoring benefits and added to the explained variance in mentoring benefits explained by mentoring quality. Findings suggest high-quality mentoring relationships may have a role in nurses’ longevity in an organization. The concept of nurse mentoring and experiences of staff nurse protégés demonstrate Magnet model components of Transformational Leadership; Structural Empowerment; Exemplary Professional Practice; New Knowledge, Innovations, and Improvements; and Empirical Quality Outcomes. Future research examining the role mentoring benefits has on predictors of retention and length of employment is needed.         en_GB
dc.subjectMagneten_GB
dc.subjectmentoringen_GB
dc.subjectpediatric nursingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:46:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:46:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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