2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201686
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stepping Strong to Control Blood Pressure, Weight, and Fatigue
Author(s):
Ennen, Kathleen Ann
Author Details:
Kathleen Ann Ennen, PhD, RN
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) One of three U. S. adults has high blood pressure. It is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke contributing to 326,000 deaths in 2006 and costing $76.6 billion in health care services, medications, and missed days of work (CDC, 2010). The American Heart Association (2011) reports that 120-150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week can reduce the risk burden of high blood pressure for heart disease and stroke. Among U. S. adults, being overweight or obese is associated with nearly 112,000 excess deaths and a decreased life expectancy. Fatigue negatively affects a person's actual and perceived physical well-being and the ability to exercise regularly. This ongoing study is examining the impact of a planned 10-week walking and educational program on a southeast United States adult community-based population's blood pressure, weight, and perception of fatigue using the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF). Additionally, the Stroke Recognition Questionnaire (SRQ) provides an understanding of what these participants know or do not know about stroke warning signs and risk factors. Currently, 26 adults (25 women, one male), mean age of 58.52 years, have completed the program, and another 36 adults are in week four. Preliminary data analysis indicates that the severity, distress, and degree of interference in activities of daily living of fatigue decreased as the average number of steps walked per day in week one increased from 4354 to 5842 steps in week ten (p=.004). In this initial group no significant decrease in blood pressure or weight is noted. Stroke knowledge scores improved from week one to week ten. Results of this ongoing study are encouraging regarding the usefulness of a community-based group program of walking and education to address control of blood pressure and weight, decrease effect of fatigue, and improve stroke knowledge.
Keywords:
Fatigue; High Blood Pressure; Physical Activity
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
41st Biennial Convention: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Health
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Grapevine, Texas USA
Description:
41st Biennial Convention - 29 October-2 November 2011. Theme: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Health. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & convention Center.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleStepping Strong to Control Blood Pressure, Weight, and Fatigueen
dc.contributor.authorEnnen, Kathleen Annen
dc.author.detailsKathleen Ann Ennen, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201686-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) One of three U. S. adults has high blood pressure. It is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke contributing to 326,000 deaths in 2006 and costing $76.6 billion in health care services, medications, and missed days of work (CDC, 2010). The American Heart Association (2011) reports that 120-150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week can reduce the risk burden of high blood pressure for heart disease and stroke. Among U. S. adults, being overweight or obese is associated with nearly 112,000 excess deaths and a decreased life expectancy. Fatigue negatively affects a person's actual and perceived physical well-being and the ability to exercise regularly. This ongoing study is examining the impact of a planned 10-week walking and educational program on a southeast United States adult community-based population's blood pressure, weight, and perception of fatigue using the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF). Additionally, the Stroke Recognition Questionnaire (SRQ) provides an understanding of what these participants know or do not know about stroke warning signs and risk factors. Currently, 26 adults (25 women, one male), mean age of 58.52 years, have completed the program, and another 36 adults are in week four. Preliminary data analysis indicates that the severity, distress, and degree of interference in activities of daily living of fatigue decreased as the average number of steps walked per day in week one increased from 4354 to 5842 steps in week ten (p=.004). In this initial group no significant decrease in blood pressure or weight is noted. Stroke knowledge scores improved from week one to week ten. Results of this ongoing study are encouraging regarding the usefulness of a community-based group program of walking and education to address control of blood pressure and weight, decrease effect of fatigue, and improve stroke knowledge.en
dc.subjectFatigueen
dc.subjectHigh Blood Pressureen
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:47:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:47:19Z-
dc.conference.date2011en
dc.conference.name41st Biennial Convention: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Healthen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, Texas USAen
dc.description41st Biennial Convention - 29 October-2 November 2011. Theme: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Health. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & convention Center.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.-
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