Multi-Layered Outcomes of an Academic-Community Partnership Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201693
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multi-Layered Outcomes of an Academic-Community Partnership Project
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Access to health services remains challenging for the underserved. Although the newly passed Affordability Care Act will cover more uninsured people, undocumented immigrants have explicitly been excluded from the provisions of this law (Sanchez et al, 2011). Even among underserved populations with access to health care, navigating American health care system is complex, fragmented, and arcane (Sofaer, 2009). This is especially true for the very sick, poor, less educated and individuals with lower English literacy skills. In addition, health care access through public health clinics and community health centers is uneven and funding is often disease or care-specific. Breaks in prevention services and the challenges to basic health care access call for projects geared toward disease prevention and health promotion among underserved communities. Method: Faculty, nursing students and community stakeholders participated in a project that provided underserved clients with health services and resources that could improve their health and lifestyles. Evaluation: Project impact was measured by workshops delivered; type and quantity of health screenings; attendance; and health related agencies that provided services and resources. Measure of faculty’s leadership include: roles in strategic planning, collaboration with stakeholders, communication of project plans and goals, and team building. Outcomes: • Underserved populations accessed health resources and information; and preventive care.  • Faculty demonstrated clear leadership abilities in connecting and collaborating within and across disciplines and organizations through team building. Conclusion: The planning and implementation of this project involved leadership skills in facilitating interdisciplinary collaborations and clear communication among stakeholders. Engaging nursing students and the larger health care community to provide health services to underserved clients is cost effective and constitutes an essential policy strategy to improve public’s health. This partnership project presents a model for sustainable academic-community relationship.
Keywords:
Healthcare access; Under-served; Community partnership
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMulti-Layered Outcomes of an Academic-Community Partnership Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201693-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Access to health services remains challenging for the underserved. Although the newly passed Affordability Care Act will cover more uninsured people, undocumented immigrants have explicitly been excluded from the provisions of this law (Sanchez et al, 2011). Even among underserved populations with access to health care, navigating American health care system is complex, fragmented, and arcane (Sofaer, 2009). This is especially true for the very sick, poor, less educated and individuals with lower English literacy skills. In addition, health care access through public health clinics and community health centers is uneven and funding is often disease or care-specific. Breaks in prevention services and the challenges to basic health care access call for projects geared toward disease prevention and health promotion among underserved communities. Method: Faculty, nursing students and community stakeholders participated in a project that provided underserved clients with health services and resources that could improve their health and lifestyles. Evaluation: Project impact was measured by workshops delivered; type and quantity of health screenings; attendance; and health related agencies that provided services and resources. Measure of faculty’s leadership include: roles in strategic planning, collaboration with stakeholders, communication of project plans and goals, and team building. Outcomes: • Underserved populations accessed health resources and information; and preventive care.  • Faculty demonstrated clear leadership abilities in connecting and collaborating within and across disciplines and organizations through team building. Conclusion: The planning and implementation of this project involved leadership skills in facilitating interdisciplinary collaborations and clear communication among stakeholders. Engaging nursing students and the larger health care community to provide health services to underserved clients is cost effective and constitutes an essential policy strategy to improve public’s health. This partnership project presents a model for sustainable academic-community relationship.en_GB
dc.subjectHealthcare accessen_GB
dc.subjectUnder-serveden_GB
dc.subjectCommunity partnershipen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:47:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:47:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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