Childhood Lead Poisoning in Immigrant Children of Brooklyn, New York: Making an Impact on this Silent Epidemic Using Appropriate Multicultural Education of Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201695
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Childhood Lead Poisoning in Immigrant Children of Brooklyn, New York: Making an Impact on this Silent Epidemic Using Appropriate Multicultural Education of Caregivers
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Childhood lead poisoning continues to be a silent epidemic despite the attempts to remove sources of lead in the environment over the past 40 years. Of major concern at this time is the blood lead level status of foreign-born children that has been found to be five times higher than United States born children. Researchers evaluating New York City foreign born children found an even stronger correlation between lead poisoning and recent residence in a foreign country. It was noted that children living overseas for less than six months before having their Blood Lead Levels tested were 11 times more likely to have elevated Blood Lead Levels that United States born children. (Tehranifar, Leighton, Auchincloss, Faciano, Alper, Paykin, & Wu, 2008). In the New York City Borough of Brooklyn (King’s) the incidences of Childhood Lead Poisoning is 43% higher than the other NYC Boroughs and the highest rate in the State of New York. This dissertation research is examining the lead knowledge of parents and caregivers of children ages 6 months to 6 years in Brooklyn, New York (NYCDOHMH, 2005). Additionally, an evaluation of the multicultural written educational materials available to this group as well as the implementation of a multicultural / linguistic video on Childhood Lead Poisoning is being conducted. References: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Lead Poisoning and Prevention Program (2005).  New York City plan to eliminate childhood lead poisoning. New York City Department of Health: New York, New York. Tehranifar, P., Leighton, J., Auchincloss, A.H., Faciano, A., Alper, H., Paykin, A., & Wu S. (2008). Immigration and risk of childhood lead poisoning: findings from a case control study of New York City children. American Journal of Public Health, 98 (1) 92- 97. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2006.093229.
Keywords:
Brooklyn; New York; Lead; Immigrants
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildhood Lead Poisoning in Immigrant Children of Brooklyn, New York: Making an Impact on this Silent Epidemic Using Appropriate Multicultural Education of Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201695-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Childhood lead poisoning continues to be a silent epidemic despite the attempts to remove sources of lead in the environment over the past 40 years. Of major concern at this time is the blood lead level status of foreign-born children that has been found to be five times higher than United States born children. Researchers evaluating New York City foreign born children found an even stronger correlation between lead poisoning and recent residence in a foreign country. It was noted that children living overseas for less than six months before having their Blood Lead Levels tested were 11 times more likely to have elevated Blood Lead Levels that United States born children. (Tehranifar, Leighton, Auchincloss, Faciano, Alper, Paykin, & Wu, 2008). In the New York City Borough of Brooklyn (King’s) the incidences of Childhood Lead Poisoning is 43% higher than the other NYC Boroughs and the highest rate in the State of New York. This dissertation research is examining the lead knowledge of parents and caregivers of children ages 6 months to 6 years in Brooklyn, New York (NYCDOHMH, 2005). Additionally, an evaluation of the multicultural written educational materials available to this group as well as the implementation of a multicultural / linguistic video on Childhood Lead Poisoning is being conducted. References: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Lead Poisoning and Prevention Program (2005).  New York City plan to eliminate childhood lead poisoning. New York City Department of Health: New York, New York. Tehranifar, P., Leighton, J., Auchincloss, A.H., Faciano, A., Alper, H., Paykin, A., & Wu S. (2008). Immigration and risk of childhood lead poisoning: findings from a case control study of New York City children. American Journal of Public Health, 98 (1) 92- 97. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2006.093229.en_GB
dc.subjectBrooklynen_GB
dc.subjectNew Yorken_GB
dc.subjectLeaden_GB
dc.subjectImmigrantsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:47:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:47:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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