Developing and Implementing End of Program OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations) for an Undergraduate BSN Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing and Implementing End of Program OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations) for an Undergraduate BSN Program
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Project Summary Final semester nursing students are required to obtain a minimum score on a standardized test to graduate. Although these tests are highly predictive of NCLEX success, a didactic exam cannot evaluate a students’ readiness to practice clinically.  In the summer of 2010, End of Program OSCE was designed to exam students' ability to perform safely in the clinical setting. Methodology: A pilot study was conducted in the summer of 2010 to determine the clinical competency of 16 graduating senior nursing students. Students were tested on their ability to perform basic skills and to think critically as they cared for simulated patients in a realistic and controlled environment. Checklists were used to verify students’ completion of tasks.  Discussion: The End of Program OSCE design was based on national nursing education standards including Institute of Medicine (IOM), Quality and Safety in Nursing Education (QSEN), National League of Nursing (NLN), and Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing’s Curricular Concepts along with the top 10 DRGs in North Texas were integrated into the patient care scenarios.  Communication skills, safe medication administration, and the ability to perform a focused assessment were evaluated. Conclusions and Implications for Nursing Education: The initial end of program OSCE was used to gather data about the students’ performance in the clinical setting. Each student was evaluated on their ability to perform in the controlled clinical environment of the Smart Hospital™. Data revealed the need for a consistent evaluation method, better communication with the students, and the need for student remediation. The remediation took place during student’s Capstone in the hospital with a preceptor. Ongoing changes will be discussed. Passing OSCE ensures employers that our graduates are safe and ready to perform competently at the entry level.  
Keywords:
Simulation; Transition to practice; OSCE
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping and Implementing End of Program OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations) for an Undergraduate BSN Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201708-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Project Summary Final semester nursing students are required to obtain a minimum score on a standardized test to graduate. Although these tests are highly predictive of NCLEX success, a didactic exam cannot evaluate a students’ readiness to practice clinically.  In the summer of 2010, End of Program OSCE was designed to exam students' ability to perform safely in the clinical setting. Methodology: A pilot study was conducted in the summer of 2010 to determine the clinical competency of 16 graduating senior nursing students. Students were tested on their ability to perform basic skills and to think critically as they cared for simulated patients in a realistic and controlled environment. Checklists were used to verify students’ completion of tasks.  Discussion: The End of Program OSCE design was based on national nursing education standards including Institute of Medicine (IOM), Quality and Safety in Nursing Education (QSEN), National League of Nursing (NLN), and Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing’s Curricular Concepts along with the top 10 DRGs in North Texas were integrated into the patient care scenarios.  Communication skills, safe medication administration, and the ability to perform a focused assessment were evaluated. Conclusions and Implications for Nursing Education: The initial end of program OSCE was used to gather data about the students’ performance in the clinical setting. Each student was evaluated on their ability to perform in the controlled clinical environment of the Smart Hospital™. Data revealed the need for a consistent evaluation method, better communication with the students, and the need for student remediation. The remediation took place during student’s Capstone in the hospital with a preceptor. Ongoing changes will be discussed. Passing OSCE ensures employers that our graduates are safe and ready to perform competently at the entry level.  en_GB
dc.subjectSimulationen_GB
dc.subjectTransition to practiceen_GB
dc.subjectOSCEen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:48:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:48:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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