2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201718
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional Intelligence in Nursing
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Practice problems Nurses are responsible for using emotional skills to evaluate and promote patient’s emotional health.  There is very limited research relating to measuring emotional abilities of nurses.  Research from professions outside nursing has demonstrated that EI abilities can be developed.  In the oncology clinical environments emotional health needs are particularly acute. This feasibility study was undertaken to assess and improve EI abilities in oncology nurses. Evidence used and synthesized Data was collected on rounds participants: mood/energy reports, emotional assessments, and evaluations of rounds efficacy. Rounds outcomes were evaluated via chart reviews, and reports of nurse satisfaction/retention. Improvement implementation strategy There is no published research on developing EI in nurses.  The feasibility of “EI Rounds” was evaluated in this study. On a clinical oncology unit, emotional issues for nurses and patients were discussed during three minute rounds. Thirty registered nurses, from a wide range of age, education, and ethnicity participated.   Evaluation method Summative and formative strategies were utilized throughout and at conclusion of the study. Results Comparison of pre and post study measures demonstrated a significant increase in emotional care evaluation and planning at the end of the study period.  100% of nurses participating in rounds reported its effectiveness.  Assessment of the nurses’ emotional abilities during rounds revealed the inability of a large percentage of nurses to identify either their patient’s emotions or their own.  This pilot study’s findings validate the importance of EI to oncology nursing and suggest its potential for improving patient care.  The intervention feasibility was rated as high. The intervention was easy to implement, well received by nursing staff, and would be easy to replicate on a larger scale. The potential for this interventions’ positive impact on patient care and burnout prevention make it a significant first step in improving the clinical environment of care.  
Keywords:
Emotional Intelligence; Performance; Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional Intelligence in Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201718-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Practice problems Nurses are responsible for using emotional skills to evaluate and promote patient’s emotional health.  There is very limited research relating to measuring emotional abilities of nurses.  Research from professions outside nursing has demonstrated that EI abilities can be developed.  In the oncology clinical environments emotional health needs are particularly acute. This feasibility study was undertaken to assess and improve EI abilities in oncology nurses. Evidence used and synthesized Data was collected on rounds participants: mood/energy reports, emotional assessments, and evaluations of rounds efficacy. Rounds outcomes were evaluated via chart reviews, and reports of nurse satisfaction/retention. Improvement implementation strategy There is no published research on developing EI in nurses.  The feasibility of “EI Rounds” was evaluated in this study. On a clinical oncology unit, emotional issues for nurses and patients were discussed during three minute rounds. Thirty registered nurses, from a wide range of age, education, and ethnicity participated.   Evaluation method Summative and formative strategies were utilized throughout and at conclusion of the study. Results Comparison of pre and post study measures demonstrated a significant increase in emotional care evaluation and planning at the end of the study period.  100% of nurses participating in rounds reported its effectiveness.  Assessment of the nurses’ emotional abilities during rounds revealed the inability of a large percentage of nurses to identify either their patient’s emotions or their own.  This pilot study’s findings validate the importance of EI to oncology nursing and suggest its potential for improving patient care.  The intervention feasibility was rated as high. The intervention was easy to implement, well received by nursing staff, and would be easy to replicate on a larger scale. The potential for this interventions’ positive impact on patient care and burnout prevention make it a significant first step in improving the clinical environment of care.  en_GB
dc.subjectEmotional Intelligenceen_GB
dc.subjectPerformanceen_GB
dc.subjectNursingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:49:03Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:49:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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