Evidence-Based Practice: An Opportunity to Change the Culture Surrounding Clinical Research?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201721
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Practice: An Opportunity to Change the Culture Surrounding Clinical Research?
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The majority of the general public believes that clinical research is important, but less than 5% of eligible adult patients participate in CT. While the public harbors mistrust towards some aspects of research, they do trust nurses.  Nurses have the potential to affect CT accrual and the culture surrounding CR/CT, but lack the education to do so.  Although the baccalaureate curriculum in the United States has included nursing research since the 1970s, much of the focus has been on teaching students the research process.  With the introduction of the Institute of Medicine competencies for health professionals in 2003 and subsequent revision of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials of Baccalaureate Education, schools are beginning to revise their curricula to include evidence-based practice.  This shift away from teaching the practice of research and toward the use of research provides an opportunity to strengthen CR/ CT content in the undergraduate curriculum.  As health care becomes increasingly evidence-based, as the settings for CR/CT expand, and as more patients gain awareness of and access to CTs, it is imperative that nurses possess the requisite skills and knowledge to safely care for patients participating in CR/CT.  We have undertaken a project to better understand nurses’ knowledge and attitudes toward CR/CT in education and practice and to better understand CR/CT content in the undergraduate curriculum, with the ultimate goal of influencing   key stakeholders.  Individual, one hour telephone interviews were conducted with nurses representing schools of nursing faculty, nurse executives, staff development directors, and nurses.  In addition, a 90 minute online focus group was conducted with 25 SON deans to explore issues related to CR/CT content in the baccalaureate curriculum. This presentation will discuss these findings in the context of the current environment surrounding CR/CT and the impact nurses can make in changing the culture.
Keywords:
evidence-based practice; nursing education; clinical research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Practice: An Opportunity to Change the Culture Surrounding Clinical Research?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201721-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The majority of the general public believes that clinical research is important, but less than 5% of eligible adult patients participate in CT. While the public harbors mistrust towards some aspects of research, they do trust nurses.  Nurses have the potential to affect CT accrual and the culture surrounding CR/CT, but lack the education to do so.  Although the baccalaureate curriculum in the United States has included nursing research since the 1970s, much of the focus has been on teaching students the research process.  With the introduction of the Institute of Medicine competencies for health professionals in 2003 and subsequent revision of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials of Baccalaureate Education, schools are beginning to revise their curricula to include evidence-based practice.  This shift away from teaching the practice of research and toward the use of research provides an opportunity to strengthen CR/ CT content in the undergraduate curriculum.  As health care becomes increasingly evidence-based, as the settings for CR/CT expand, and as more patients gain awareness of and access to CTs, it is imperative that nurses possess the requisite skills and knowledge to safely care for patients participating in CR/CT.  We have undertaken a project to better understand nurses’ knowledge and attitudes toward CR/CT in education and practice and to better understand CR/CT content in the undergraduate curriculum, with the ultimate goal of influencing   key stakeholders.  Individual, one hour telephone interviews were conducted with nurses representing schools of nursing faculty, nurse executives, staff development directors, and nurses.  In addition, a 90 minute online focus group was conducted with 25 SON deans to explore issues related to CR/CT content in the baccalaureate curriculum. This presentation will discuss these findings in the context of the current environment surrounding CR/CT and the impact nurses can make in changing the culture.en_GB
dc.subjectevidence-based practiceen_GB
dc.subjectnursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectclinical researchen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:49:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:49:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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