“Save Our Breasts”: Breast Cancer Spirituality, Fatalism and Fear in African-American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
“Save Our Breasts”: Breast Cancer Spirituality, Fatalism and Fear in African-American Women
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Breast cancer is the most common cancer in African-American (AA) women and AA women under 45 have the highest incidence of any U.S. ethnic group. The breast cancer mortality rate is higher in AA women than that of all U.S. ethnic groups. Barriers to breast cancer mammography screening by  AA women include fatalism and fear. Spirituality is associated with health, and is important to many AA women. It is unclear as to whether spirituality is related to fatalism in AA women.  The Powe Fatalism Model was used as the theoretical basis. This pilot study tested a culturally appropriate intervention, "Save Our Breasts", a breast health forum, in 29 AA women using a quasi-experimental pre and post-test design. The forum included AA breast cancer survivors’ personal testimonies, prose, poetry, photographs, and quotations. Seventy-five AA women over 35 from churches and community organizations were invited to participate. A spirituality survey was administered prior to the intervention and surveys on fear and fatalism were adminstered prior to and immediately after. All surveys are reliable and have been validated in AA women. Nonparametric statistical analyses were used due to the skewed data and the small sample size. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was used to analyze the effect of the “Save Our Breasts” forum on fear and fatalism and the Spearman’s Rho test used to analyze the correlation between spirituality and fatalism. Although the fatalism and fear scores were lower after the intervention, the difference was not significant. There were negative correlations between spirituality and fatalism before and after the intervention with a stronger correlation evident after the intervention. This study should be continued with a larger sample to determine whether fear and fatalism are lessened after the “Save Our Breasts” forum and whether there is a significant relationship between spirituality and fatalism.
Keywords:
FATALISM; AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN; SPIRITUALITY
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title“Save Our Breasts”: Breast Cancer Spirituality, Fatalism and Fear in African-American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201733-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Breast cancer is the most common cancer in African-American (AA) women and AA women under 45 have the highest incidence of any U.S. ethnic group. The breast cancer mortality rate is higher in AA women than that of all U.S. ethnic groups. Barriers to breast cancer mammography screening by  AA women include fatalism and fear. Spirituality is associated with health, and is important to many AA women. It is unclear as to whether spirituality is related to fatalism in AA women.  The Powe Fatalism Model was used as the theoretical basis. This pilot study tested a culturally appropriate intervention, "Save Our Breasts", a breast health forum, in 29 AA women using a quasi-experimental pre and post-test design. The forum included AA breast cancer survivors’ personal testimonies, prose, poetry, photographs, and quotations. Seventy-five AA women over 35 from churches and community organizations were invited to participate. A spirituality survey was administered prior to the intervention and surveys on fear and fatalism were adminstered prior to and immediately after. All surveys are reliable and have been validated in AA women. Nonparametric statistical analyses were used due to the skewed data and the small sample size. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was used to analyze the effect of the “Save Our Breasts” forum on fear and fatalism and the Spearman’s Rho test used to analyze the correlation between spirituality and fatalism. Although the fatalism and fear scores were lower after the intervention, the difference was not significant. There were negative correlations between spirituality and fatalism before and after the intervention with a stronger correlation evident after the intervention. This study should be continued with a larger sample to determine whether fear and fatalism are lessened after the “Save Our Breasts” forum and whether there is a significant relationship between spirituality and fatalism.en_GB
dc.subjectFATALISMen_GB
dc.subjectAFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.subjectSPIRITUALITYen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:49:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:49:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.