Transforming Perspectives in EOL Care through High Fidelity Simulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201735
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transforming Perspectives in EOL Care through High Fidelity Simulation
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Significance: Health professionals increasingly work with diverse individuals from many cultures. Awareness of personal biases to persons from other cultures/religions is imperative and should be addressed in basic educational programs. Simulations in EOL provide opportunities for transformational learning as students are challenged to reflect on preconceived notions about death, culture, religion, discuss these with other students during the debriefing, and try new ways of thinking and doing.  Method: PharmD students participated in a High Fidelity simulation that focused on the final minutes of  life and interval following.  Students and faculty played the roles of health care workers and  family. The scenario portrayed a middle aged Hispanic, Catholic, End stage renal patient who had decided to stop dialysis. After the scenario, the students were given time to provide both written and oral reflection of their feelings. Following the reflection, critical discourse occurred among the students and faculty focusing on student feelings related to death, EOL care, cultural and family issues, etc. and how these feelings could impact EOL care. Content analysis was used to analyze student reflections.  Findings: Students identified that their attitudes were influenced by previous personal experiences. As they listened to peers, they reported their perspectives broadened. They also reported that they were better prepared for care of a dying patient.  Conclusion: EOL is a universal phenomenon.  Culture and religion play a very important part in all major life events, particularly at EOL. The use of high fidelity simulation via an EOL scenario provides the loom on which the threads of culture and religion are woven resulting  in a unique and personalized tapestry that remains an integral part of the family long after the death. Awareness of attitudes and exposure to other ways of thinking and doing will ultimately improve preparation for, and provision of, EOL care for all.  
Keywords:
transformative learning; EOL education; high fidelity simulation
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransforming Perspectives in EOL Care through High Fidelity Simulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201735-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Significance: Health professionals increasingly work with diverse individuals from many cultures. Awareness of personal biases to persons from other cultures/religions is imperative and should be addressed in basic educational programs. Simulations in EOL provide opportunities for transformational learning as students are challenged to reflect on preconceived notions about death, culture, religion, discuss these with other students during the debriefing, and try new ways of thinking and doing.  Method: PharmD students participated in a High Fidelity simulation that focused on the final minutes of  life and interval following.  Students and faculty played the roles of health care workers and  family. The scenario portrayed a middle aged Hispanic, Catholic, End stage renal patient who had decided to stop dialysis. After the scenario, the students were given time to provide both written and oral reflection of their feelings. Following the reflection, critical discourse occurred among the students and faculty focusing on student feelings related to death, EOL care, cultural and family issues, etc. and how these feelings could impact EOL care. Content analysis was used to analyze student reflections.  Findings: Students identified that their attitudes were influenced by previous personal experiences. As they listened to peers, they reported their perspectives broadened. They also reported that they were better prepared for care of a dying patient.  Conclusion: EOL is a universal phenomenon.  Culture and religion play a very important part in all major life events, particularly at EOL. The use of high fidelity simulation via an EOL scenario provides the loom on which the threads of culture and religion are woven resulting  in a unique and personalized tapestry that remains an integral part of the family long after the death. Awareness of attitudes and exposure to other ways of thinking and doing will ultimately improve preparation for, and provision of, EOL care for all.  en_GB
dc.subjecttransformative learningen_GB
dc.subjectEOL educationen_GB
dc.subjecthigh fidelity simulationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:49:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:49:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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