Raising Awareness of the Local and Global Burden of Hansen's Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Raising Awareness of the Local and Global Burden of Hansen's Disease
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Hansen’s disease is a curable infectious disease of biblical notoriety that continues to cause great disability and stigma globally, including the United States. Many clinicians believe that HD, or leprosy, is an ancient disease localized to underdeveloped countries, but the National Hansen’s Disease Programs reminds clinicians that HD still exists in the United States and should not be overlooked. As international travel becomes more common, clinicians are called to be familiar with populations that are susceptible to HD. It is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and is manifested by hypopigmented, hypoaesthetic lesions, enlarged peripheral nerves, and/or neuropathy. It is estimated that >95% of the general population have innate immunity to HD, and molecular genetic studies have identified some of the genes responsible. High risk groups include individuals from Brazil, Angola, India, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Pacific Island nations to name a few.  The disease is also endemic in Louisiana & Texas.  Therefore, clinicians should keep Hansen’s disease as a possible differential diagnosis in patients with history of travel or with chronic, non-healing lesions. The presence of acid fast bacilli within nerves in a skin biopsy is diagnostic. Where there is no access to a laboratory, diagnosis is made based on clinical presentation. With the introduction of multidrug therapy, this disease is highly curable and early treatment prevents disability and deformity. However, the long incubation period along with the ever-present stigma, inhibit patients from early diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis can lead to progressive and permanent damage to skin, nerves, limbs, and vision. There is no vaccine, and despite intensive leprosy control strategies, Hansen’s disease continues to evade eradication. The goal is for those affected by Hansen’s disease to lead normal lives with dignity.
Keywords:
leprosy; tropical disease; Hansen's Disease
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRaising Awareness of the Local and Global Burden of Hansen's Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201740-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Hansen’s disease is a curable infectious disease of biblical notoriety that continues to cause great disability and stigma globally, including the United States. Many clinicians believe that HD, or leprosy, is an ancient disease localized to underdeveloped countries, but the National Hansen’s Disease Programs reminds clinicians that HD still exists in the United States and should not be overlooked. As international travel becomes more common, clinicians are called to be familiar with populations that are susceptible to HD. It is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and is manifested by hypopigmented, hypoaesthetic lesions, enlarged peripheral nerves, and/or neuropathy. It is estimated that >95% of the general population have innate immunity to HD, and molecular genetic studies have identified some of the genes responsible. High risk groups include individuals from Brazil, Angola, India, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Pacific Island nations to name a few.  The disease is also endemic in Louisiana & Texas.  Therefore, clinicians should keep Hansen’s disease as a possible differential diagnosis in patients with history of travel or with chronic, non-healing lesions. The presence of acid fast bacilli within nerves in a skin biopsy is diagnostic. Where there is no access to a laboratory, diagnosis is made based on clinical presentation. With the introduction of multidrug therapy, this disease is highly curable and early treatment prevents disability and deformity. However, the long incubation period along with the ever-present stigma, inhibit patients from early diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis can lead to progressive and permanent damage to skin, nerves, limbs, and vision. There is no vaccine, and despite intensive leprosy control strategies, Hansen’s disease continues to evade eradication. The goal is for those affected by Hansen’s disease to lead normal lives with dignity.en_GB
dc.subjectleprosyen_GB
dc.subjecttropical diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectHansen's Diseaseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:50:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:50:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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