Educational Intervention to Reduce Breast Cancer Disparities: The Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Research Coalition

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educational Intervention to Reduce Breast Cancer Disparities: The Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Research Coalition
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Introduction:  Lack of knowledge and access to screening and feelings of fear and fatalism lead to significant breast cancer disparities for Texas minority and low-income populations.  Almost 37% of African Americans are diagnosed with breast cancer in the late stages of the disease, compared to only 28% of non-Hispanic whites; and only 62% of women who have a household income below $25,000 are adherent to recommended mammography screenings, compared to 71% of the total population.1 Aims and Methods:  The Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Coalition conducted this study to develop and evaluate a community-based intervention to reduce cancer disparities in a low-income, primarily African American neighborhood in Dallas. To evaluate the program, women from two Dallas neighborhoods, one as the control and one as the intervention group, were enrolled into the study.  The 60 women enrolled in the control group received only written educational materials concerning breast health, 59 women in the intervention received eight weekly sessions that included written materials, cooking demonstrations, and clinician presentations. All intervention group participants were encouraged to attend a mobile mammography event.  Women from both groups were surveyed before and four months after the intervention to assess the program’s efficacy at promoting breast cancer screening uptake. Results and Conclusions:  At follow-up, women in the intervention group were 10.430 times (p<0.000) more likely to have had a mammogram in the last year and 2.958 (p=0.047) times more likely to have had a breast self exam in the last month, compared to the control group.  However, women in the intervention group were no more likely to have had a clinical breast exam in the last year compared to the control group. Lessons learned from this study have been used to create a sustainable, community-based education program, which is being conducted in Dallas County with funding from CPRIT.
Keywords:
Breast; Dallas Breast Cancer; Cancer
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducational Intervention to Reduce Breast Cancer Disparities: The Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Research Coalitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201762-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Introduction:  Lack of knowledge and access to screening and feelings of fear and fatalism lead to significant breast cancer disparities for Texas minority and low-income populations.  Almost 37% of African Americans are diagnosed with breast cancer in the late stages of the disease, compared to only 28% of non-Hispanic whites; and only 62% of women who have a household income below $25,000 are adherent to recommended mammography screenings, compared to 71% of the total population.1 Aims and Methods:  The Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Coalition conducted this study to develop and evaluate a community-based intervention to reduce cancer disparities in a low-income, primarily African American neighborhood in Dallas. To evaluate the program, women from two Dallas neighborhoods, one as the control and one as the intervention group, were enrolled into the study.  The 60 women enrolled in the control group received only written educational materials concerning breast health, 59 women in the intervention received eight weekly sessions that included written materials, cooking demonstrations, and clinician presentations. All intervention group participants were encouraged to attend a mobile mammography event.  Women from both groups were surveyed before and four months after the intervention to assess the program’s efficacy at promoting breast cancer screening uptake. Results and Conclusions:  At follow-up, women in the intervention group were 10.430 times (p<0.000) more likely to have had a mammogram in the last year and 2.958 (p=0.047) times more likely to have had a breast self exam in the last month, compared to the control group.  However, women in the intervention group were no more likely to have had a clinical breast exam in the last year compared to the control group. Lessons learned from this study have been used to create a sustainable, community-based education program, which is being conducted in Dallas County with funding from CPRIT.en_GB
dc.subjectBreasten_GB
dc.subjectDallas Breast Canceren_GB
dc.subjectCanceren_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:51:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:51:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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